4
| News |

David's Café Launches Cafecito Pop-Up at Soho Beach House

David's Café has opened a pop-up inside the Soho Beach House lobby on Collins Avenue.EXPAND
David's Café has opened a pop-up inside the Soho Beach House lobby on Collins Avenue.
Photo by David Gonzalez
^
Keep New Times Free
I Support
  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism
  • logo

Support the independent voice of Miami and help keep the future of New Times free.

Longtime South Beach favorite David's Café will be serving up its famous cafecitos and pastelitos — albeit for a short time — at a temporary pop-up coffee shop.

David's Café owner Adrian Gonzalez closed David's Café Cafetico on Alton Road in August, citing COVID-19 as a factor in the decision. Still, Gonzalez was hopeful he'd be able to reopen the café his parents created more than 40 years ago.

Now, the beloved Miami Beach institution is using pop-up appearances to keep tradition alive.

"When people come to Miami, they want to experience that Cuban coffee culture," Gonzalez tells New Times. "With these pop-ups, we are able to re-create that whole experience in-house for them."

For his new pop-up experience, Gonzalez partnered with Soho Beach House. The temporary coffee shop has taken over the hotel's lobby and check-in area, where it will operate daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

The David's cafecito is part of an art installation called Espabilate by Cuban artist Manny Prieres in collaboration with Primary Projects and David’s Cafe.

Although Cafecito is currently slated to run through Saturday, January 3, the pop-up may continue through January if all goes well, Gonzalez says.

The menu offers locals and tourists alike the opportunity to indulge in classic David's Café menu items like Cuban cafecitos, cortaditos, coladas, and hot or cold café con leche alongside traditional Cuban cheese, meat, and guava pastries.

The collaboration stands as one in a series of similar pop-up shops the beloved café has hosted over the past several months — an effort Gonzalez tells New Times he hopes to continue at other locations across Miami.

"I'd like to keep doing these pop-ups," he says. "I love the creativity and excitement of working with different venues, and the amazing amount of love we continue to get from the people of Miami."

David's Café dates back to 1976, when Alfredo and Maria Gonzalez opened a hole-in-the-wall eatery called Three Boys Luncheonette on Normandy Isle. A year later, the couple opened a second location in South Beach; the spot was a former Jewish deli called David's Café, and the couple chose to keep the name. The business has stayed in the family, as Adrian continues to tend to his parents' legacy.

David's Cafe Pop-up at Soho Beach House. 4385 Collins Ave., Miami Beach; 786-507-7900; davidscafecafecito.com.

Keep Miami New Times Free... Since we started Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who've won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism's existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" membership program, allowing us to keep covering Miami with no paywalls.

We use cookies to collect and analyze information on site performance and usage, and to enhance and customize content and advertisements. By clicking 'X' or continuing to use the site, you agree to allow cookies to be placed. To find out more, visit our cookies policy and our privacy policy.

 

Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Miami.

 

Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Miami.