Beer & Wine

Beat Culture Celebrates Grand Opening With Mead and Beer Bottle Release

Beat Culture's guava mead, I Can't Believable, will be released at the brewery's grand-opening celebration Saturday, March 16.
Beat Culture's guava mead, I Can't Believable, will be released at the brewery's grand-opening celebration Saturday, March 16. Beat Culture Brewing Company
click to enlarge Beat Culture's guava mead, I Can't Believable, will be released at the brewery's grand-opening celebration Saturday, March 16. - BEAT CULTURE BREWING COMPANY
Beat Culture's guava mead, I Can't Believable, will be released at the brewery's grand-opening celebration Saturday, March 16.
Beat Culture Brewing Company
Miami's newest brewery, Beat Culture, will celebrate its official grand opening this Saturday, March 16, with a triple bottle release as well as a limited number of bottles of the already-popular pink guava mead.

Beat Culture's founders — brothers Alan and Dan Espino and Erik Durr — pooled their efforts to create a brewery that is dedicated to offering small-batch, hyper-local beer, mead, and food.

"We know beer. But our idea has always been to go on a journey of all things fermentable. Beer, of course, cider, honey wine — even hot sauces — and we are not stopping there," Alan Espino says. "Today we're committed to staying a small-batch brewery while sourcing ingredients as local as possible.”

The Beat Culture mantra is most apparent in the mead — the brewery makes, bottles, and sells its own line of meads created using Loxahatchee-based McCoy Farms honey. The mead is refermented with loads of locally sourced fruits, produced in small batches. Typically no more than 100 bottles are sold for each release, and the 375-milliliter hand-filled-and-labeled bottles sell for $25 to $35 apiece.


"This weekend, I'm most excited to release more of our guava mead, called I Can't Believable. It really hits the mark for a South Florida mead," Durr says of the 14 percent ABV mead flavored with pink guava. "It was really well received when first released. Our whole batch sold out in 30 hours so I'll be making a larger batch of it in the coming months."

For the grand-opening event, Durr and the Espinos partnered with several local businesses for Beat Culture's first official beer release. They used Miami-based Per'la Coffee and cacao nibs from Cao Chocolates for Clock Shadow, the bottled coffee-and-chocolate variant of their imperial stout. The release will also include Fuacata, a tart ale infused with South Florida mango and passionfruit; and Juice Palace, a milkshake IPA with red papaya.

In addition, the opening party will see the release of a new batch of Fight Milk, made in collaboration with Lincoln's Beard Brewing. Fight Milk is a mango milkshake IPA made with locally sourced mangoes from Southwest Ranches-based Alegria Mango Farm. Along with trying a laundry list of other beers, guests will also be able to sample Shamrock Shake, created in collaboration with Bangin' Banjo Brewery. The mint and vanilla milkshake IPA was inspired by the St. Paddy's Day-themed green milkshakes released by McDonald's.

Beat Culture is also experimenting with a growing list of fermented hot sauces. Fermented hot sauces produce complex flavors not found in traditional vinegar-based hot sauces, Alan says, and pair perfectly with the brewery’s growing selection of breakfast, lunch, and dinner fare prepared by the in-house restaurant, 3rd Heritage Kitchen.

The grand opening will take place from 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday, March 16. By RSVP'ing on Eventbrite, attendees will be entered into the Beat Culture Golden Ticket contest, which will award one lucky winner free beer for a year. Expect South Florida and out-of-state guest brewers to pour at the event, as well as dozens of one-off variants of Beat Culture beers served with a specialty food menu prepared by 3rd Heritage.

Beat Culture Grand Opening. 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday, March 16, at 7250 NW 11th St., Miami; 786-431-5413; beatculture.co. Admission is free. RSVP via eventbrite.com to be entered into a contest to win free beer for a year.
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Nicole Danna is a Palm Beach County-based reporter who began covering the South Florida food scene for New Times in 2011. She also loves drinking beer and writing about the area's growing craft beer community.
Contact: Nicole Danna