Beer & Wine

Yediel Kadosh Opens Ciao Bella Natural Wine Bar Pop-Up

Yediel Kadosh is opening a natural wine pop-up in Wynwood.
Yediel Kadosh is opening a natural wine pop-up in Wynwood. Photo courtesy of Ciao Bella Natural Wine Bar
click to enlarge Yediel Kadosh is opening a natural wine pop-up in Wynwood. - PHOTO COURTESY OF CIAO BELLA NATURAL WINE BAR
Yediel Kadosh is opening a natural wine pop-up in Wynwood.
Photo courtesy of Ciao Bella Natural Wine Bar
Yediel Kadosh's love of natural wines became somewhat of an obsession when he spent months looking for a bottle he particularly fell for at a restaurant.

"I discovered this natural wine and loved it so much, it took me five months to find another bottle. I was on a mission," Kadosh tells New Times.

That one bottle led the restaurateur to research natural wines and try more varietals.

Kadosh explains that natural wines typically come from smaller, boutique winemakers. Though there's no official distinction for natural wines, generally they're made without any additives from growers that don't use any pesticides or herbicides. Because of that, they're harder to get than wines from larger growers. "Some of the wines we're carrying come from vineyards that produce 2,000 bottles total. You're not going to see those wines on the shelves at Publix. You have to rely on small wine shops and it becomes very difficult if you want to find a specific wine."


Now, Kadosh is opening a pop-up natural wine bar in Wynwood. Ciao Bella Natural Wine Bar will open July 8 at Charly's Vegan Tacos while the restaurant remains on hiatus for the summer.

Kadosh, who brought the Tulum taco concept to Miami, in May 2018, said the wine pop-up was a natural fit to occupy the Wynwood space until Charly's reopens.

Ciao Bella will offer a selection of 15 to 20 bottles of natural wines, priced from $45 to $90. There are no corkage fees to drink the wines on-premises. Guests who wish to take home some bottles will receive a small discount.

The bar will also offer Mediterranean-inspired small plates, such as red-pepper hummus, falafel, marinated olives, and truffle fries.

The pop-up style is "fast-casual," meaning guests can pick out their own bottle of wine and order food at the counter.

The bar will offer indoor and outdoor seating, and Kadosh intends to bring in live music. He says he wants Ciao Bella to be a place where people can discover natural wines in a casual setting.

"This is now what you typically expect from a wine bar. Wine can be out of reach from an expense perspective, but these wines have super, summery, drink-in-the-park vibes," says Kadosh.

The wine list will rotate with availability but expect a selection of whites, reds, rosés, skin-contact, and sparkling wines. "This hope is that every time you come, you have a slightly different experience," says Kadosh.

Ciao Bella won't stay open until the wee hours of the morning. "I want this to be a manageable evening out for people," Kadosh explains. "I would rather go and drink wine with friends than go out at midnight. That being said, sharing a bottle of wine is an excellent way to start a night out."

Ciao Bella will open for about three months — until Charly's Vega Tacos reopens. Kadosh says Charly's team made a decision to keep the restaurant closed until fall, and he thought the space would make a great spot for a temporary wine bar.

"Wynwood is a great place to go for beer, and many restaurants have a good wine selection, but there are few places to just drink wine in a casual setting." 

Ciao Bella Natural Wine Bar.
172 NW 24th St., Miami; ciaobellawinebar.com. Thursday through Sunday 6 p.m. to midnight.
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Laine Doss is the food and spirits editor for Miami New Times. She has been featured on Cooking Channel's Eat Street and Food Network's Great Food Truck Race. She won an Alternative Weekly award for her feature about what it's like to wait tables.
Contact: Laine Doss