Florida's Kids Can Now Donate The Maximum Amount to Political Campaigns

Just because they can't vote apparently doesn't mean that Florida's children shouldn't be able to donate as much as an adult can to state and local campaigns. A Miami federal judge essentially lifted the two-decade old ban that limited the amount of campaign contributions minors could make, saying that the Florida law was unconstitutional.


Under Florida law, adults 18 and over can donate up to $500 to state and local campaigns. The amount was capped at $100 for those 18 and under. The law did not limit children's donation to federal campaigns, and anyone can donate up to $2,500 to a federal race.

According to the Associated Press, the ACLU decided to challenge the law after Boca Raton teenager Julie Towbin, then 17, decided not to attend a fundraising dinner for the Palm Beach County Democratic Executive Committee. Tickets were set at $150, and her attendance would have ran afoul of the law.

Now, I know what you're thinking. Won't rich people just donate the maximum amount to their preferred candidates under the kids names to get around campaign donation limits? Well, that's exactly why the law was enacted in the first place. U.S. District Judge Kathleen Williams however said that there's little evidence that that was ever a problem in Florida or elsewhere.

In this post-Citizens United world, the rich have far more appealing ways to support their preferred candidates than writing a $500 check in Johnny Jr.'s name anyway.

Williams placed a temporary injunction on enforcement of the law and will likely declare the law unconstitutional, which could lead to it getting struck down once and for all. It's unclear if Pam Bondi's justice department will appeal the decision.

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