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11 Questions About the Miami Heat Entering the Oddest Offseason Ever

The Miami Heat managed to bring us entertainment, joy, and much-needed normalcy.EXPAND
The Miami Heat managed to bring us entertainment, joy, and much-needed normalcy.

It has been just over a week since the Miami Heat ended an unforgettable NBA Finals playoff run, but Miami sports fans are still a bit emotionally hungover. The unusual experience of the Heat advancing deep into the NBA Finals — but never playing a home game — left fans on their knees, screaming at television sets instead of inside the arena where they belong.

And now, suddenly, it's over. The strangest NBA season ever ended in mid-October, a time when the new season normally begins. Instead, the NBA has begun an offseason that's likely to run into January.

So what do Heat fans have to look forward to during the holidays, a time when there are usually games being played? Here are a few questions that should keep Heat fans on their toes until the team takes the court again.

Will the Heat actually make a selection in the NBA draft? The NBA draft takes place November 18. That's weird. In a normal year, the Heat has usually already played a handful of games by mid-November. But this year, the team will be looking for another young player to add to its core.

The Heat will have the 20th pick in this year's draft — unless the pick is traded for a win-now type player. More on that next....

Will the Heat be active in the offseason trade market? There are plenty of moves the Heat can make between today and November, and nearly all of them include trading away the team's first-round draft pick in the name of adding another win-now veteran to the locker room.

Who might that be? New Orleans Pelicans guard Jrue Holiday is a name to watch. On a larger scale, Paul George could become available if the Los Angeles Clippers want to blow up their highly disappointing team.

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Will the Heat keep Goran Dragic? There seems to be no doubt that Miami is the place Goran Dragic should be in 2021. Jimmy Butler and Dragic are best buddies, and Dragic was one of the biggest reasons Miami made a deep run this year.

But Miami wants to keep its options open for next offseason, when players like Giannis Antetokounmpo will be available, meaning Dragic will have to be flexible on the money side of things if he wants to stick around. It's likely Dragic gets a big one-year deal this offseason, and the two sides revisit matters next year.

Does Udonis Haslem move on to life after basketball? We've asked the question for what feels like the last seven years. Since the Big Three broke up, it was always assumed that Haslem was on a year-to-year contract that carried over to the next if he wanted to return.

Last season, everyone thought Haslem would retire alongside Dwyane Wade. Instead, he returned and escorted the Heat to the NBA Finals. Does he go for another round, or will he move to the coaching side of the bench? Or will he spend his time doing things for the community and becoming a businessman?

Whatever UD does, he'll no doubt be great at it, and the people around him will be lucky to have him there.

Will Tyler Herro start next season? After blowing up in the playoffs, Tyler Herro is a household name. It would make sense if he were to enter next season as a starter for the Heat. That will be dictated by whatever moves the Heat makes this offseason, though.

Herro will still only be a 20-year-old, second-year player when next season starts. It's totally possible the Heat makes him a sixth man if the roster calls for it.

Does Jae Crowder re-sign with the Heat? Jae Crowder was the definition of a "glue guy" during the Heat's amazing finals run. Even when his three-point shot was off, he was a vital part of the team on the defensive end and an active player on the offensive end. He just does the right things over and over. Sometimes they work out and sometimes they don't, but Crowder is about as safe a player as the Heat could ask for in his spot.

Crowder is likely to command a good contract this offseason. But like Dragic, he may be willing to take a bigger one-year deal that would allow the Heat to keep its 2021 options open.

Is there any way Derrick Jones Jr. returns to the Miami Heat? The obvious answer to the question of whether the Heat will re-sign Jones Jr. — a player who barely saw the floor during the entire playoffs — is no. Jones Jr. has interest from other teams that may view him as more of a difference-maker than the Heat did.

So he's likely a goner from Miami. He's one of those players who's nice to develop and use in your rotation but nowhere near vital enough to justify paying big bucks for when the time comes.

Is there room for Meyers Leonard to return? Of all the players who may not return to the Heat, Meyers Leonard may be the biggest question mark. Leonard started all season and was a model, card-carrying member of the Heat-Culture Club, but when the playoffs rolled around, he only played a handful of minutes, mostly owing to injuries.

Leonard is a seven-footer who can hit the three-pointer. He won't come cheap. He probably doesn't fit into the Miami Heat's future plans.

When will the new season begin, and will there be fans? When and where the next season will begin is never a thing we spend time discussing or wondering about. As with everything else in 2020, nothing is usual or normal.

As of now, there's a real possibility that next season will begin in late January, and that it will do so within another NBA bubble. That would be a subpar outcome but something totally understandable, given how well the first bubble went. Good luck selling players on going through that ordeal again, though. Changes will be made if the league tries to duplicate the feat.

Who will Jimmy Butler recruit to Miami? A lot of rumors are flying around as to which player — be it via free agency or via trade — could be on their way to Miami. After making the NBA Finals and impressing the entire nation, the Miami Heat is a hot destination.

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The bigger question is this: Who does Jimmy Butler most want to play with? Giannis Antetokounmpo is on everyone's radar, but he's a winning lottery ticket at this point. Of the second-tier players, is there one Butler likes most? It will be interesting to watch social-media moves this offseason.

When does Bam Adebayo get paid? Bam is going to get paid. He's a max player the Miami Heat will pay as much money as the league will allow. The question is if the team gives him the contract this offseason, or if he agrees to put it off a year in hopes that he Heat can make some ninja salary-cap moves that would allow them to fit a big fish (like Antetokounmpo) under the cap.

Chances are Bam is understanding of the situation but wants to get paid. Fans can't blame him if he wants to become financially secure for life right now rather than chance it for another year in the name of the greater good.

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