Culture

Too Soon? Internet Pissed at Miami TikTok Star's Open-Casket Funeral Photoshoot

Miami influencer Jayne Rivera posted photos in front of her father's open casket. The internet did not approve.
Miami influencer Jayne Rivera posted photos in front of her father's open casket. The internet did not approve. Screenshots via Instagram
The five stages of grief are denial and isolation, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance.

It appears they may need to add a sixth: engagement.

On Monday, Miami TikToker and Instagram influencer Jayne Rivera posted a series of photos on Instagram, in which she appears to be smirking and posing in a fitted black dress and stockings in front of her father's open casket, which is draped with an American flag. She notes on her website that she lives in Miami.

One photo shows her placing her hands together in prayer. In the other, she appears to smile at the camera.


"Butterfly fly away," reads the post, which amassed nearly 12,000 likes before her account went offline. "Rip Papi you were my bestfriend. A life well lived. #rip #papi #veteran #ptsd #funeral #neverforgotten."

She also posted the white dove and American flag emojis.

Rivera, who has 307,300 followers on TikTok, has described herself as a fitness model on Instagram and has an OnlyFans account.

Last week, she posted to her roughly 84,800 Instagram followers that her father had died, according to the New York Post.


But Rivera's recent photoshoot was met with swift backlash from all across the internet, with some calling her "vile" and "sick."

Her account has since been taken down.

"Funeral photo shoots? Yeesh," wrote one.

"Shit is just vile, and down right disgusting," commented another.

New Times was unable to reach Rivera for comment.
 
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Alex DeLuca is a fellow at Miami New Times.
Contact: Alex DeLuca