4

J Balvin Producer Sky Rompiendo Is Happy to Stay Behind the Scenes

Sky Rompiendo
Sky Rompiendo
Photo by Ian Witlen/Red Bull Sound Select/Content Pool
^
Keep New Times Free
I Support
  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism
  • logo

Support the independent voice of Miami and help keep the future of New Times free.

Many people jump into the music industry intending to release hit records, star in lavish music videos, and perform in front of massive crowds of adoring fans. Not Sky Rompiendo.

The Colombian producer always dreamed of becoming the hitmaker behind the star — just like his idols Timbaland and Pharrell Williams.

“I was always drawn more towards those types of personalities,” says Rompiendo (AKA Alejandro Ramirez) over Zoom from his home in Miami. “Of course, I like artists and want to be in that camp, but I never wanted to be the first guy you see. I was interested in working behind-the-scenes. I was the kind of geek who would read the credits [on albums].”

This “geek,” who bounced in between Medellín, Colombia, and Miami as a kid, would go on to become the right-hand man for global icon and fellow Colombian J Balvin. Rompiendo now sees his name listed in the credits of some of the biggest songs in Latin urban music, including Balvin’s "Ginza" and "Ay Vamos."

Thanks in part to his alliance with Balvin and the current Latin music boom, Rompiendo is experiencing the sort of fame that was once rare territory for reggaeton producers.

On Saturday, December 19, Rompiendo will close out Red Bull's Estados Unidos de Bass livestream event, which he also kicked off in Miami earlier this month, along with fellow producer Ovy on the Drums. This is the second year in a row that Rompiendo has performed at the Latin music-focused event.

Next year, Rompiendo plans to release his first album — sort of a "Sky Rompiendo presents"-type album full of features. It's a project he admits that his fans have been clamoring for.

"I’m here for that pressure from the people," he says. "I started the new album recently and will be putting out singles real soon. It’s not me singing. I’m the producer presenting friends and other artists that I listen to. I’ll drop some vocals, but that’s not the main idea of the project.”

Sky Rompiendo performing at Estados Unidos de Bass on December 5.
Sky Rompiendo performing at Estados Unidos de Bass on December 5.
Photo by Ian Witlen/Red Bull Content Pool

That's not to say Rompiendo hasn't jumped on the mic before. He can be heard rapping with Balvin on “Verde," the song off of Balvin's Colores, winner of Best Urban Album at last month's Latin Grammys.

“We’re family,” Rompiendo says of Balvin. “With family, you get comfortable and do things like this. I wanted people to know I can jump on the mic. And I thought it would be fun to be in the video. But it’s not my everyday. It’s not why I do this.”

Besides Balvin, Rompiendo — who has six Latin Grammy awards to his name — has worked with Nicky Jam, Bad Bunny, Karol G, and Juanes. How does working with a rocker such as Juanes compare to working with a reggaeton artist such as Balvin?

“It’s very different. First, because of the music they do. Second because of their age,” says Rompiendo, referring to the 13-year age gap between Balvin and the older Juanes. “Juanes has more years in the studio, so I’m sort of like a student when I’m with him. With Balvin, it’s more of a brother thing. But the creative process always gets us to the same point.”

Rompiendo has also dabbled with working with English-language acts, with a goal of crossing over in the near future. After all, he says hip-hop is the music he most listens to.

So far, Rompiendo has coproduced Travis Scott and Rosalía’s "TKN," which peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot Latin Songs chart, and cowrote Balvin’s "Safari" collaboration with Pharrell Williams and BIA. Working with Williams was a reminder for Rompiendo of how far he’s come. (He says he used to study videos of Williams in the studio on YouTube.)

But as much as Rompiendo has seen his profile rise, he says his fame is still manageable, especially compared to that of the many of the artists he works with.

“It’s not like people are always asking me for a picture or want to know everything about me, like what I eat in the morning,” Rompiendo says. “It’s been positive.”

Red Bull Estados Unidos de Bass. 5 p.m. Saturday, December 19. Stream via redbull.com.

Keep Miami New Times Free... Since we started Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who've won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism's existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" membership program, allowing us to keep covering Miami with no paywalls.

We use cookies to collect and analyze information on site performance and usage, and to enhance and customize content and advertisements. By clicking 'X' or continuing to use the site, you agree to allow cookies to be placed. To find out more, visit our cookies policy and our privacy policy.

 

Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Miami.

 

Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Miami.