We're not recommending a specific trail or route through this historic agricultural district, but we do recommend you explore it on foot sooner than later. The building boom exploding throughout the southern part of the county means it's only a matter of time before the quiet back roads and fragrant groves and colorful nurseries and lushly landscaped ranch homes are but a memory. A good place from which to set out is the county's 32-acre Fruit and Spice Park (24801 SW 187th Ave., 305-247-5727), a unique collection of some 500 types of fruits, nuts, spices, and herbs. Prepare for sun, heat, bugs, and road-hogging farm equipment.

We're not recommending a specific trail or route through this historic agricultural district, but we do recommend you explore it on foot sooner than later. The building boom exploding throughout the southern part of the county means it's only a matter of time before the quiet back roads and fragrant groves and colorful nurseries and lushly landscaped ranch homes are but a memory. A good place from which to set out is the county's 32-acre Fruit and Spice Park (24801 SW 187th Ave., 305-247-5727), a unique collection of some 500 types of fruits, nuts, spices, and herbs. Prepare for sun, heat, bugs, and road-hogging farm equipment.

Maybe Oleta River State Recreation Area (3400 NE 163rd St., North Miami) is the perpetual winner in this category, but since Amelia Earhart won "Best Place To Mountain Bike" back in 1999 and then slipped a few notches, drastic improvements have been made, thanks mostly to the volunteer efforts of a local cycling group known as In Da House, a mountain-bike crew that cares. These cyclists have weeded, repaired, cleaned, and made improvements to the park just as it seemed on the verge of being declared unsafe (and off-limits) for bikers. It's still not a technically oriented biking location (there's the occasional mud hole and such), but that makes it all the better for newcomers to the booming sport who have felt the patronizing glares of experienced mountain bikers at other trails. How do you become a winner? Work at it.

Amelia Earhart Park
Maybe Oleta River State Recreation Area (3400 NE 163rd St., North Miami) is the perpetual winner in this category, but since Amelia Earhart won "Best Place To Mountain Bike" back in 1999 and then slipped a few notches, drastic improvements have been made, thanks mostly to the volunteer efforts of a local cycling group known as In Da House, a mountain-bike crew that cares. These cyclists have weeded, repaired, cleaned, and made improvements to the park just as it seemed on the verge of being declared unsafe (and off-limits) for bikers. It's still not a technically oriented biking location (there's the occasional mud hole and such), but that makes it all the better for newcomers to the booming sport who have felt the patronizing glares of experienced mountain bikers at other trails. How do you become a winner? Work at it.

We searched long and hard for the best clothing-optional beach and came up empty. Well, maybe not empty, but without a winner. South Beach provided the hunting grounds. First it was off at Third and Ocean, where a bounty of bronzed Brazilians, in full splendor, were walking around wearing nothing but floss, just as they do in Rio and the rest of their nation. Around Fifteenth through Eighteenth streets we saw an unusual number of other tourists flashing flesh. After extensive, grinding, drooling -- er, grueling -- sifting through a sea of suitless tanners, we had to face the realization that, thanks to the wonderfully amoral nature of Miami's citizens, there are no longer any boundaries when it comes to drop-top bikinis. Block after block of beach features people wearing what they wore when they were born, although females exposing their breasts are the most common nudephiles. That's why this year we give this award to all the sunbathers who made South Beach the biggest, coolest wardrobe malfunction this side of the Super Bowl.

We searched long and hard for the best clothing-optional beach and came up empty. Well, maybe not empty, but without a winner. South Beach provided the hunting grounds. First it was off at Third and Ocean, where a bounty of bronzed Brazilians, in full splendor, were walking around wearing nothing but floss, just as they do in Rio and the rest of their nation. Around Fifteenth through Eighteenth streets we saw an unusual number of other tourists flashing flesh. After extensive, grinding, drooling -- er, grueling -- sifting through a sea of suitless tanners, we had to face the realization that, thanks to the wonderfully amoral nature of Miami's citizens, there are no longer any boundaries when it comes to drop-top bikinis. Block after block of beach features people wearing what they wore when they were born, although females exposing their breasts are the most common nudephiles. That's why this year we give this award to all the sunbathers who made South Beach the biggest, coolest wardrobe malfunction this side of the Super Bowl.

To hard-core bikers, pedaling through ungentrified parts of a city is more an exercise for the imagination than for the body. And the south side of Wynwood, with its plethora of factory buildings, graffiti-covered walls, and commercial signage, offers plenty to think about. Begin at North Miami Avenue and 36th Street, heading south. Note the string of art galleries along the west side, a sign that gentrification is around the corner. Soon you'll pass a hatbox of a building, the lovely Dorissa of Miami factory on 27th Street. Turn west on 27th and begin winding through the neighborhood to NW Fifth Avenue. You'll have biked by some of Miami's oldest homes, and businesses with painted signs advertising shoes, handbags, and synthetic or human hair. Keep heading west to NW Sixth Avenue, where you'll run into Interstate 95 humming with traffic. About two blocks south rest the ruins of the RC Cola bottling factory. Its perimeter wall has some of the best graffiti in Miami. Interspersed along NW Second Avenue are little cafeterias where you can stop for a beer. At NW 22nd Street turn east and face the mighty Continental Heidelberg Cement Factory. Though it may seem intimidating at night, the trip is worth the adventure. The glow of street lamps and security lights makes everything appear funkier, and any danger you sense is probably just your imagination.

To hard-core bikers, pedaling through ungentrified parts of a city is more an exercise for the imagination than for the body. And the south side of Wynwood, with its plethora of factory buildings, graffiti-covered walls, and commercial signage, offers plenty to think about. Begin at North Miami Avenue and 36th Street, heading south. Note the string of art galleries along the west side, a sign that gentrification is around the corner. Soon you'll pass a hatbox of a building, the lovely Dorissa of Miami factory on 27th Street. Turn west on 27th and begin winding through the neighborhood to NW Fifth Avenue. You'll have biked by some of Miami's oldest homes, and businesses with painted signs advertising shoes, handbags, and synthetic or human hair. Keep heading west to NW Sixth Avenue, where you'll run into Interstate 95 humming with traffic. About two blocks south rest the ruins of the RC Cola bottling factory. Its perimeter wall has some of the best graffiti in Miami. Interspersed along NW Second Avenue are little cafeterias where you can stop for a beer. At NW 22nd Street turn east and face the mighty Continental Heidelberg Cement Factory. Though it may seem intimidating at night, the trip is worth the adventure. The glow of street lamps and security lights makes everything appear funkier, and any danger you sense is probably just your imagination.

Since Wei Lun Huang won in 1998, the popularity of this "Best Ancient Chinese Secret" has spread far and wide (and word has probably even reached the Great Masters he studied with back in China). Master Huang's patience with students is legendary and his skills in the internal martial arts (tai chi chuan, qigong, liu he ba fa, and ba gua, among others) are over the top. While his teaching style may seem unorthodox to some (especially to those who've dealt with hippy-dippy, New Age instructors), the results are so astounding that among Master Huang's loyal students are several teachers as well. A point of enlightenment to inspire your beginning: Meditation is just as important to performance as are technical skills. You can find his casual Monday-night class behind the North Miami Beach Public Library. Because he travels for numerous out-of-town seminars, it's imperative to keep tabs on Master Huang's schedule either by phone or through the Website.

Since Wei Lun Huang won in 1998, the popularity of this "Best Ancient Chinese Secret" has spread far and wide (and word has probably even reached the Great Masters he studied with back in China). Master Huang's patience with students is legendary and his skills in the internal martial arts (tai chi chuan, qigong, liu he ba fa, and ba gua, among others) are over the top. While his teaching style may seem unorthodox to some (especially to those who've dealt with hippy-dippy, New Age instructors), the results are so astounding that among Master Huang's loyal students are several teachers as well. A point of enlightenment to inspire your beginning: Meditation is just as important to performance as are technical skills. You can find his casual Monday-night class behind the North Miami Beach Public Library. Because he travels for numerous out-of-town seminars, it's imperative to keep tabs on Master Huang's schedule either by phone or through the Website.

Best Of Miami®

Best Of Miami®