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| Crime |

Hungarian Man Convicted for Keeping Gay Sex Slaves in Miami

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Andras Vass, a 25-year-old Hungarian national, faces up to 155 years in prison after being convicted of running a gay sex-slave ring that eventually made its way to Miami-Dade County. Vass was one of three men arrested last October after authorities busted them keeping another three men captive in a home in the western reaches of the county. 

Vass — along with Gabor Acs, 31, and Viktor Berki, 28 — recruited three young men over in Europe. They met two of the victims in Hungary on the dating site GayRomeo.com They met the third through Facebook, who, at the time, was working as a prostitute. Vass and his compatriots moved the men originally to New York City under the guise that they would be offered legitimate work and would be able to return to Hungary after just a few months. 

Instead, upon arriving in New York, the men were locked in a one-bedroom apartment and forced to perform sex acts on paying customers and also have sex with one another on a web cam. Up to five other men were also living in the small apartment at the time. 

Meanwhile, the organizers locked the men's passports away. They told the men that it would be dangerous for them to leave because they did not speak English, and threatened their families' safety back home. 

A few months after their arrival in New York in 2012, Vass relocated the three men to a home in Miami-Dade County, way out in the 13300 block of NW Eighth Lane, southwest of Doral. It was there that the Miami-Dade State Attorney's Office and Homeland Security made the bust. 

According to the Miami Herald, the three victims testified against Vass during the four-day trial. Jury deliberations took just 30 minutes, and Vass was convicted on all counts of human trafficking and racketeering. His sentencing is scheduled for June; he faces up to 155 years behind bars and a minimum of 21 years. His codefendants are awaiting trial. 

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