95 Express: Pay more, get injured, wait in traffic

Rory Santana, the happy, overworked troll of Miami-Dade County's highways, bursts out of his office in the boxy, drab Traffic Management Center in Doral. "Talk about luck!" he hollers to a visiting reporter, his voice shrill with excitement. "We've reached our maximum rate!"

Bearded and bespectacled in a rumpled button-down shirt, Santana surveys the scene through the large window in his office.

The expansive room outside resembles a NASA control center, with rows of office chairs and computers facing a giant mosaic of screens — all of them filled with live footage of clogged bumper-to-bumper traffic.

Melvina Durden and her attorney, Spencer Aronfeld
George Martinez
Melvina Durden and her attorney, Spencer Aronfeld

Santana is studying Interstate 95's 16 miles of tolled express lanes, which move an average of 57,000 drivers a weekday. It's rush hour Monday afternoon, and Miami's monster highway's northbound lanes are besieged by motorists headed to watch the Dolphins take on — and lose to — the New England Patriots. With the express lanes charging drivers based on congestion, the thousands of poor souls foolish enough to use it now will be billed the approximate price of a stadium beer.

"They're paying $7," marvels Santana, the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) district manager overseeing the lanes, "to park on the highway."

This gruff weekend fisherman knows the express lanes — derisively branded the "Lexus lanes" — aren't the darling of the local populace. "When I go to happy hour," Santana admits, "I don't tell people what I do."

The FDOT company line, of course, is quite different. Spokesperson Alicia Torrez gushes that the express lanes are "smarter, safer, and more efficient" than a normal highway.

But those ripped-from-a-pamphlet boasts, it turns out, are as flimsy as the plastic express-lane partitions Miami drivers regularly mow down with impunity. There's no evidence that the 95 Express project has made the highway safer. In fact, it appears the opposite is true, with the FDOT — which has raked in $28 million in tolls since launching the program in August 2008 — turning I-95 into what one state trooper called a "demolition derby."

More fundamentally, the express lanes, soon to be more than doubled in length with an $85 million expansion into Broward County, invites urban sprawl and is of little use to the county paying for it. "The program totally screws over Miami-Dade drivers," Transit Miami blogger Gabriel Lopez-Bernal says. "It's completely misguided."

In 2007, Miami was one of five "urban partners" to share a billion dollars from the federal government to introduce "congestion pricing" toll systems. The others were Minneapolis/St. Paul, New York City, San Francisco, and Seattle.

In most of those cities, the notion of paying to use roads that were previously free rankled the citizenry. In the Bay Area, politicians for three years battled opposition to bridge congestion tolls before finally forcing through the program — decried by the San Francisco Chronicle as "unpopular" — last year. And in New York City, a similar plan tolling entry to Manhattan was squashed after Brooklyn and Queens councilpeople protested it would turn their boroughs into isolated, urban Icelands.

In the other four potential cities, congestion pricing models were all designed to pry people from their cars so they'd use public transportation. But what the FDOT cooked up — no-exit lanes that speed motorists between downtown and the suburbs — only jams more vehicles onto the highway at a faster rate.

The money raised through tolls doesn't go toward any other form of mass transportation as it does elsewhere. It pays only for upkeep and police on the lanes, as well as the 95 Express bus, which carries an estimated 1,200 commuters a weekday — a tiny fraction of the 300,000 drivers who use the same stretch of highway.

It doesn't add up to a forward-thinking model, says Transit Miami's Lopez-Bernal: "All it's doing is encouraging people to commute from the burbs. That's really the last thing Miami needs."

Perhaps it's appropriate, then, that the inception of 95 Express was two weeks of chaotic and litigation-spawning bumper-crumpling.

The FDOT was intent on becoming the first agency to implement congestion pricing. In July 2008, it planted plastic partitions along the northbound, eight-mile stretch of I-95 — consistently shown by studies to be the most dangerous road in the nation. They did it in the "dead of night," says then-Florida Highway Patrol spokesperson Pat Santangelo, without warning the public.

The few road signs informing motorists of the new partitions, Santangelo recalls, were full of misinformation and typos. Drivers became trapped in the lanes for miles as they sped past exits to Little Haiti, North Miami, and North Miami Beach. They turned the partitions into a high-speed slalom.

"What happened was they put those poles up and they didn't tell anybody," says Santangelo, who is now a spokesperson for Miami Mayor Tomás Regalado. "Immediately the next morning, a big truck overturned. That's how the day began."

Santangelo rushed to do what the FDOT hadn't — getting booked on Kreyol-language radio to warn Haitian drivers of the dangerous lanes. But the chaos continued for weeks, and Homestead mom Melvina Durden still has the scars and the hobble to show for it.

On July 11, 2008, Durden was on her day off from her cashier job at Pollo Tropical, riding in the passenger seat of her friend Melody's Ford Taurus as they headed to North Miami in the express lanes. Melody realized she was too far to the left at the last minute and swerved through the lane dividers to make the NW 135th Street exit. The car flipped, and they ended up in a mangled pile of metal against the wall on the other side of the highway. "I thought for sure I was going to die," Durden says. "They were the most horrifying moments of my life."

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23 comments
Max
Max

"Major accident shuts down I-75? Raise the tolls! It's bonus time!"

Sheldon
Sheldon

the whole state should be toll free

david
david

I wish they would do us all a favor and admit they made a horrible mistake and return the road to the way it was. The only reason people in those express lanes go faster is that they exceed the speed limit by a significant degree. Maybe the cops should ticket those guys on occasion and raise some real money for the state/county/city. Oh wait, they can't because there's no place to pull the cars over.

david
david

So with all the problems and congestion on I-95 the answer our genius politicians came up with was create an extra lane by making the other lanes narrower and removing the shoulder. Yes, I can see how that was supposed to make the road safer.

Lisa
Lisa

As a Seattlite, we see the same issues with our highway system, I can concur that the express lanes are a pain in the butt. However, as a former professional driver, people need to quit being in such a hurry, they need to pay attention to their surroundings, and if you're about to miss your exit, SAFELY go to the next one and turn around!

no whiners allowed
no whiners allowed

I'm sorry but these drivers are idiots the cones are clear DONT CROSS. If you miss your exit then you go to the next one and come back if you try to cross several lanes of traffic after going through the cones ILLEGALLY then you deserve whatever happens to you.

RollBackTolls
RollBackTolls

FDOT claims people should know instinctively to stay out of the Lexus Lanes when it reaches a high dollar amount. At least you have a choice and can stay on the "non-toll' lanes. Not, FREE, because we all pay a lot in gas tax for the "non toll" lanes. Learn more at www.RollBackTolls.com

Quian35
Quian35

Some people feels others are at fault on their lack of inteligence, common sense and abundant stupidity; and this article gives clear evidence of it. Many of them not even had a horse to ride on before coming to this country, much less they can read a road sign while they drive

Mrche
Mrche

i though i was alone one the bad haitian drivers thing..they really cant freaking drive.. plus more

Jorge Hurtado
Jorge Hurtado

seriously, the only reason all these accidents are happening is not bc of the express lanes. it's bc of the shitty miami drivers. i have lived here my whole life and nothing changes. specially the bad hatian drivers they get worse and worse every year... don't blame the roads when its the shitty drivers fault. maybe people should pay attention to what they are doing read the fucking signs and quit blaming others for their mistakes.

phudge1
phudge1

Maybe they should settle. Ask McDonalds!

Penny Minge Kamish
Penny Minge Kamish

I've worked in journalism and traffic management for years. My first point in the "slur" on Mr. Santana as "a troll". WOW, that''s not what I was taught to be "color" commenting. Next, having utilized the Express Lanes (I am not from SEFL area), they are well marked about limited access on and off. Perhaps people should pay more attention to the signs instead of their cell phones, iPods, etc. Express lanes are meant to help distribute traffic more evenly, and even the folks who say they cannot afford the Express lane costs, benefit, I would estimate, by at least 15% better speeds in the "free lanes" due to the folks transferring over to the Express Lanes. When I see a line of rubber "candlesticks" blocking access, the light bulb goes off for me..."oh, I shouldn't cut through those", and relative to the comment of the revenues not going for other projects, I say YAY! They estimated the costs of quick clearance vehicles, dedicated police, etc., instead of marking up the price additionally for other projects.This article by Mr. Garcia-Roberts strikes me as his "goal" being to do as negative an article as possible, regardless of any positive information he "uncovered". He succeeded! Oh, and if these Express Lanes are soooooo BAD, wonder why FDOT has won awards for such a well-run, efficient project. After all, we do run out of land and the ability to expand, so efficiency and management is the only way to accommodate the rapidly increasing number of motorists. SHAME ON YOU, Mr. Garcia-Roberts for your unprofessional slurs and lack of proper research.

anon_e_m00se
anon_e_m00se

And get run over by a Escalade ESV driving, texting while drinking a Starbucks coffee and reading the newspaper Miami driver.

Brandt A.
Brandt A.

I'm an FIU student and I don't drive. Everyday I take FIU's express bus that travels between the Biscayne Campus and the main campus. What I've been able to observe from being in the express lanes is that the southbound lanes have a much better implementation than the northbound lanes.

The majority of the traffic in the northbound express lanes is headed towards golden glades, and the exit is only two lanes - one lane for the express lane traffic, and one lane for the 'free lane' traffic. Southbound 95, however, has 5 lanes at the bottleneck - two for express lane traffic, and three for 'free lane' traffic. That's why the flow is so much better in the morning - the northbound lanes experience tight golden glades bottlenecking everyday, so it will always get up to $7.00.

As for the people who were injured during the early days of the lanes, I don't buy the whole "I was trapped" story. They should have just waited until it was safe to change lanes instead of being dumb and disrupting the flow of traffic and causing accidents.

And I do agree that the implementation of these lanes is misguided - encouraging people to commute from the burbs to their workplace is also encouraging car dependence - Miami doesn't need more cars on its roads. The 95 express bus is the only good thing that came out of this in my opinion.

Adam R
Adam R

As someone who must regularly commute from Miami Beach to Boca Raton at least once per week, I find the express lanes to be nothing short of a blessing. They are beyond helpful in getting passed to the Miami-Dade 1-95 traffic jams and into Broward County. I will gladly keep paying the tolls for use of those lanes and am certainly looking forward into their expansion in Broward. The one thing I do take issue with is where the toll money is going to. I would like to see the money being funneled back into the city, preferably into some sort of mass transit program.

anon_e_m00se
anon_e_m00se

I love the mentality of her feeling held "captive." The logical person just continues until they're able to exit and then backtracks. It's the same mentality that makes people slam on their brakes on the expressways when they realize they're going to miss an exit and then reverse to make the exit. Just go to the next one, head back the other direct, and then take your intended exit. Trust me that you're time isn't too important that you can't spare the 5 mins in order to not put everyone else at risk.

Vic
Vic

The driver swerves and then looses control causing injury to the passenger (durden). give me a break and how is this the fault of dot. money hungry whor*s and most likely druggies to boot.

Jeanne
Jeanne

I have 0 sympathy for the morons who plow through the pylons.

Guest
Guest

They do ticket, but it's ridiculously dangerous. They should just close down the lanes and return I-95 to what it was originally

david
david

oh no it's much smarter to cut across all lanes of traffic to make the exit. or better yet...stop your car and go in reverse! i'm not sure if it's selfishness ("my time is more important than yours") or just low IQs that cause people to do that. probably an even split.

mahalo2011
mahalo2011

Stop being an apologist for government incompetence. FDOT could have carved out at least one additional exit for North Miami-Dade County commuters (e.g., Miami Shores, Biscayne Park, North Miami, etc.).

It is ridiculous that Miami-Dade residents are being inconvenienced within their own county so that Broward County residents can have an easier commute.

mahalo2011
mahalo2011

And I have no tolerance for government incompetence.

anon_e_m00se
anon_e_m00se

Refer to my third sentence: I'm referring to the typical mentality found on the roadways in Miami-Dade... both in, and out of, the high speed lanes.

As for apologist - you couldn't be further from the truth. They're bloody incompetent and I avoid I-95 like the festering plague it is. I commute daily from Miami-Dade to Broward for work and exclusively take the Turnpike, even though my office is east and more readily accessible from 95. On the other hand, every time I've take the express lanes they work as advertised and have saved me time. I'll gladly pay whatever freight they're asking if it saves me time.

What I will grant you is that there is a major design flaw in that there are no exits located around major population centers. All other states I've been to with HOV lanes have entry and exit points at strategic locations and there is no reason we don't have them in Miami-Dade.

 
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