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Cuban Wine Creates A New Buzz

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Cuba isn't known for its wine, but a Cuban neurosurgeon is giving expatriates a taste of something other than rum to fuel their nostalgia.

Mauricio Collada Jr., who came from the island in 1962, has turned a patch of Oregon soil into a vineyard for wines stamped with a Cuban label that is flying off the shelves in Miami, according to an article today in El Nuevo Herald.

Cubanisimo Vineyards is making a Pinot Noir that is said to be the perfect accompaniment to a lechon asado or paella. Bottled in October, the wine will be sold later this year.

The vineyard, which produces 2,000 cases of wine a year -- also makes Pinot gris. Bottles go for between $16 and $30.

"The wine coming out this year has a taste of raspberry and cherry," says Collada. "It has a silky aftertaste and medium body that makes it ideal for Cuban cuisine."

While cherry and raspberry aren't exactly native Cuban fruits, the label resembles those on classic Cuban tobacco boxes and Collada's vinyard is said to be the gathering place to dance salsa and talk politics.

What could be more Cuban than that?

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