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Win Free Tickets for DJ Windows 98 (Arcade Fire’s Win Butler) at Bardot Miami

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Shania Twain. Michael Jackson. Joan Jett. Afrobeat. Haitian rara. New Wave punk. And rap-hype airhorn blasts. These are the sounds of DJ Windows 98.

His real name is Win Butler. And he also plays in a band called Arcade Fire that's won some Grammys and stuff. But when Windows is spinning records and triggering sound effects (and not holding a guitar), he is barely recognizable as Butler. His face can't be seen because he's hiding behind a blank bandana like America's Most Wanted. And his eyes are dark because he's rocking a black flatbill cap like a boss.

However, if you listen close enough, his jams reveal him. A Windows 98 set is like a two-hour mashup of all the things that Win Butler has randomly heard on a radio with all the things that he's played and replayed on his bedroom turntable, which are, collectively, all the things that have eventually somehow influenced his band's idiosyncratic songbook.

So, wanna see why the next Arcade Fire might be marked by distorted trap rap beats and post-disco synths? Just win free tickets for DJ Windows 98's set at Bardot Miami tomorrow.

DJ Windows 98 (Arcade Fire’s Win Butler) at Bardot Miami Giveaway

1. Head over to Miami New Times Music's Facebook page.
2. Find the DJ Windows 98 update (facebook.com/crossfade.miami/posts/853304271381982) and leave a comment.
3. From the pool of commenters, we'll randomly select a winner for this show at Bardot. So keep an eye on your Facebook messages.


Arcade Fire’s Win Butler as DJ Windows 98. 10 p.m. Friday, April 3, at Bardot Miami, 3456 N. Miami Ave., Miami; 305-576-7750; bardotmiami.com. Tickets cost $24 to $30 plus fees via showclix.com. Ages 21 and up.

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Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Miami.