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Sukihana
Sukihana
Photo by Trenton Barboza

Love & Hip Hop: Miami's Sukihana Howls at the Naysayers on Wolf Pussy Mixtape

There's no real alchemy to obtaining wolf pussy. No amount of Kegels or water-based lubricants or nip tucks can mesmerize a man enough that the sex alone convinces him to give you the world and then some.

Instead, it's a generational heirloom, or as the "Yous a Hoe" rapper Sukihana puts it, "You get it from your mama, but make sure you wash that mothafucka."

On the heels of her recent mixtape, Wolf Pussy — which dropped on September 2 via SoundCloud — rapper and reality-TV personality Sukihana (real name Destiny Henderson) has become a hybrid with her cheeky social-media humor and brash lyricism. Exemplified in her viral hits "5 Foot Freestyle" and the Trick Daddy- and Trina-sampling "Nann Hoe" and "Blame Trina," her unabashed hood bravado is what attracted the Love & Hip-Hop franchise to her. (In a toss-up between Atlanta and Miami editions, she ultimately decided to join the Miami cast for its third season.) It also afforded her an appearance in Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion's internet-breaking "WAP" video and a cameo alongside R&B songstress Summer Walker in her early 2000s-era "White Tee" video.

Her Instagram following has ballooned to 1.2 million and her feature on Cuban Doll's hit track "Drug Dealer" has garnered more than six million views on YouTube since its release in 2018. Still, her impressive stats haven't pushed her all the way into the lap of luxury.

In a video chat with New Times, Sukihana — AKA Suki, AKA Suki With the Good Coochie — was casually Destiny, dressed in an orange cropped hoodie and matching shorts with her blond hair slightly brushed against her tiger face tattoo. Her blunt demeanor, reified in Instagram skits and scenes on Love & Hip Hop, was toned down to a warm benevolence.

A mother of three and Wilmington, Delaware, native, Sukihana grew up with a penchant for rap. She resided in Atlanta for a few years before heading further south to Miami, where she's engaged in a reciprocal embrace with the city ever since. Wolf Pussy is steeped in an endemic 305 sound, and her explicit mien fits right in.

"I've always been really confident and always been loud. I'm just a product of my environment, but now I feel like my environment is a product of me because I see a lot of women look up to me," she says. "I've helped a lot of people learn to love themselves and have confidence."

Sukihana's version of self-love in Wolf Pussy isn't twins to the women-empowerment brunches and niche books that guide women on how to become the next Michelle Obama. Instead, she influences women to embrace the power wielded from the punani, or as she expresses in the Khia's "K-Wang" sampled track "Price Going Up," "Beat the cat till it hurts/You betta pay the bills on the first."

Following the release of "WAP," critics took to Twitter to re-air the long-held contention that such raunchiness oversexualizes women, affects how black women are portrayed in media and music, and undoes the feminist work of dismantling rigid gender expectations.

Sukihana responds that her message simply echoes what matriarchs in the hood have taught their daughters and granddaughters for generations.

"Why are you out here sleeping with all these guys and none of them are helping you with anything?" she says. "That doesn't make any sense to me. People need to stop looking at how I deliver it and listen to the message."

It's that generational gall that manifests in cuts like "Food Stamp Hoe," featuring Saucy Santana, in which Sukihana reworks the memorable hook from Freak Nasty's "Da Dip" into "You put your hands all in your pocket/Then you pull out that wallet... Want it dripping like a faucet/You got to make deposits."

"We be out here cooking and cleaning and doing everything we can for these guys who do not show us the same in return, and it's not fair," she says. "You need money, you need appreciation, you need someone who's going to wash your car and put gas in it. It's not up to you to be doing all of that but still giving pussy to these guys."

On "Gotta Man," Sukihana teams with Ball Greezy to edify her self-worth with a former fling, going blow for blow to the tune of Positive K's similarly named '90s hit. And in the mixtape's lead single, "Yous a Hoe," she expresses her disdain for the clout-chasing, promiscuous hoe in a diss-style track.

"I definitely recorded it multiple times — about four times. I had to make a clean version because of how vulgar my mouth is," she says. "I'm happy we didn't rush that track. Me and my team worked on that together. We had to put in our time and sweat to make sure it came out good."

With assists from executive producers Bigg D, Lamb, and Michael Blumstein as well as rapper Kent Jones, producer Y.O., and Kenisha "Miami Tip" Myree, Suki's raw and braggadocious delivery solidifies her home in Miami and a place alongside her peers Mulatto, City Girls, Flo Milli, and Rubi Rose.

But even as the mechanisms of fame coalesce around her, if you peel back Sukihana's layers, Destiny emerges with quiet and reserved poise. The impact of the communities that shaped her ambition isn't lost on her, and it's what gravitated fans to the album-release block party she hosted on Memorial Day in Lauderhill.

A hood girl at heart, she's more than a nouveau-riche celebrity; she's a driven mother who craves balance and fruition at her core.

"When the cameras come on, that's when Suki comes out," she says. "But I have a very small circle, and I'm a very spiritual person. I try to keep my chakras aligned, try to stay away from negative energy, and I'm big on manifestation. That's why everything I wrote down I have."

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