Art Basel Miami Beach

MOCA and Vanity Fair Party: Tracey Emin Draws Kevin Spacey and Huge Art Crowd

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Yes, we cut in front of the paparazzi to take a shot of Kevin Spacey posing with Tracey Emin. And what?

The black walls inside the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami are glowing and buzzing with Tracey Emin's work. Lines like "People Like You Need to Fuck People Like Me" and "My Cunt Is Wet with Fear" become iconic when emanating flattering light from delicate neon tubes.

We met Jay Thomas, an attendee at the opening of "Angel Without You" who wasn't familiar with Emin's work. He observed that the interior "looked like a bar," and that "this is what the inside of Twitter looks like."

After briefly meeting her, we can assume that the British art star would contest this crass assessment. But if you take a look at what's hanging on the walls, he's not totally off. Neon does often signify something's for sale, and there was a sexy bar vibe at MOCA last night that's not typical for a museum. Also, re: the Twitter comment, the neon-sculpted phrases were intimate and seemingly scribbled -- some poetic, some about anal sex. (Hey, why not?). And there were those works showing a pretty bird or -- in true Tweeter fashion -- a woman's uncrossed legs, revealing a glowing crotch.

Like the Internet, there was nothing boring about the show and everything emotional. But unlike the Internet, it felt warm, personal, and memorable.

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Liz Tracy has written for publications such as the New York Times, the Atlantic, Refinery29, W, Glamour, and, of course, Miami New Times. She was New Times Broward-Palm Beach's music editor for three years. Now she plays one mean monster with her 2-year-old son and obsessively watches British mysteries.
Contact: Liz Tracy