Haitian deportation process is unfair

Valentine's Day has just passed, and a single tear rolls down Claudine Magloire's perfect left cheek. She balls up tight, knees to chin, on a fluffy beige couch then gazes across her Pompano Beach townhouse at a framed watercolor. Two teddy bears, two swallows, and two plump red hearts deliver a message. To remember you, it reads in French. Souvenir toi.

Of the artist, 34-year-old Wildrick Guerrier, she sobs: "He's gone. He went to the bathroom. There was one cough... Then he was dead... The U.S. government killed him."

Wildrick was Claudine's lover and partner. He died suddenly last month — possibly of cholera — in Haiti after the Obama administration deported him and 26 other Haitian-Americans to their earthquake-wracked homeland. Such deportations had been suspended after the January 12, 2010, catastrophe, but this past December, agents swept up more than 350 others, about 100 from Florida, and delivered them to internment camps in a remote part of Louisiana. They await the dreaded trip back to their ruined island and, perhaps, the same painful end.

Claudine Magloire with a photo of her friend and lover, now deceased, Wildrick Guerrier.
George Martinez
Claudine Magloire with a photo of her friend and lover, now deceased, Wildrick Guerrier.
Elliot Longchamps
Elliot Longchamps

After Guerrier's death, newspaper stories were printed and mostly forgotten. Even the first black President brushed aside concerns about the world's first black republic. Neither he nor his administration is investigating. And, citing "privacy policies," his people refuse to release the names of those in custody. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokeswoman Barbara Gonzalez won't even say whether deportations have been suspended, a fact communicated to activists two weeks ago. "There haven't been any additional removals, and removals have not been suspended," she told me last week. Huh?

There's outrage in all this. Since when does the government have the right to secretly pick up U.S. residents and ship them to their deaths — even if they have criminal records? Indeed at least one of those sent to Haiti, Lyglenson Lemorin, has never been convicted of anything.

But there's also hyperbole in activists' responses. "No one should be deported to Haiti now," said Randy McGrorty, chief executive of Catholic Charities Legal Services Miami at a press conference earlier this month, "no matter what crime they committed." No one cared to ask if American taxpayers should feed and clothe noncitizen rapists and killers.

So I've spent the last couple weeks investigating Guerrier and another Miamian awaiting deportation in Louisiana, Elliott Longchamps. A close look at their lives and criminal records yields the following: bureaucratic ineptitude, government hypocrisy, and heinous violence. Longchamps, who's still in Louisiana, deserves the boot. Wildrick Guerrier didn't. And with the government unreasonably withholding names, it's hard to tell how many innocents like Guerrier are awaiting deportation.

The tragic love story of Claudine and Wildrick is this tale's beginning. She's a kind, professional woman who was born in Cap-Haitïen and moved to Fort Pierce with her family as an 8-year-old. A cheerleader, track star, and soccer player, she graduated from Fort Pierce Central High and became a single mom at age 18. Her boyfriend at the time disappeared, but she found work as an AT&T telemarketer in Fort Lauderdale and raised her playful son, Will.

It was off Sunrise Boulevard that she met Wildrick. He had come to the United States from Port-de-Paix as a 16-year-old, then played soccer at Edison Senior High in Miami. Skinny and mellow, he lived in Miami Shores across the street from Barry University with his mom, Chantal, who gave birth to two sons after arriving. Wildrick helped raise them until taking a job driving a forklift at Sun-Sentinel in Deerfield Beach in 1998.

Wildrick's cousin Mona lived near Claudine. One day, he piloted a black Nissan down their street and stopped to ask Claudine's name. They chatted. Soon he fell in love — not with her, but with then four-year-old Will.

"They'd play soccer and football, roll around a lot," Claudine remembers. "They'd go everywhere together. Wildrick was a real father figure to him." The then 22-year-old cycled through jobs at KFC and in a metals factory, often working nights. Sometimes he'd care for Will during the day, feeding him ice cream and candy. On weekends, Claudine would leave the boy with an aunt and visit Haitian nightclubs in Miami or Hallandale. She'd go with groups of four, five, or six people including Wildrick. "He always had a girlfriend," Claudine recalls. "We were like brother and sister."

What Claudine, now a mortgage loan specialist for Bank of America, didn't know back then was that Wildrick had trouble with the law. It started small, Broward County records show. He was busted in 1997 for driving without a license. He had a learner's permit but received a ticket. Three years later, he was nailed for possession of narcotics after cops found a film canister with "particles of cocaine" on Andrews Avenue, where he hung out, according to a police report. Those charges were dismissed.

"He never did drugs, but every time he hung out with the boys, he got in trouble," Claudine says. "I tried to get him away from them... and mostly I did."

His problems with the law escalated in 2002, when he was stopped by a Fort Lauderdale police officer. Identified in records as R. Fernandez, the cop claimed Wildrick had suddenly pulled his car to the side of NW Ninth Avenue in Fort Lauderdale. After the officer flashed his lights and siren, Wildrick attempted to run, and the two scuffled. Wildrick kicked the cop in the groin. Fernandez kicked him back, then arrested him after help arrived. In a deposition, Fernandez acknowledged he had not been injured. "I went home and took some painkiller and that was it," he said. Wildrick spent four months in jail.

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13 comments
Dcm2000k9
Dcm2000k9

Illegal? Kick them out!!!!!!! No matter what or from where they come.

Mark5w
Mark5w

Kicked a cop in the nuts ? did i read that right ? I don't think I would do that and im white and here legally fourth generation maybe fifth but im not sure yup plymouth rock has been under my families feet ,if you don't know what plymouth rock is look it up or go visit it ,it's in plymouth Mass They dug a hole put the rock in so people can view it .yup it's still their last time i looked

Mark5w
Mark5w

I wonder what would happen to an American citizen if they sneak into a country do something illegal GET caught and put up a fuss I bet they just hang you stone you or just shoot you imprison you and forget about you or all of the above .Deportation I think is a legal gift of the USA a Bullet would cost tax payers allot less and theway the government spends money the bullet may just be the rout they go soonso just come through the gate legal or stay the hell out .Oh and if you are here illegal up yours you deserve what ever legal tax payers can afford to do with you

Lcohoone
Lcohoone

Miami is just a racist place when it comes to people from the Afro-Islands than from Latin America, its the truth! I am neither Hatian or Latin American!

Trappedintx1
Trappedintx1

It's been my experience Cuban people seem to be more pleasant to be around, a little more motivated to go out there and work and less violent. Most Haitians I've had the displeasure to be around are rude, lazy workers, expect things to be handed to them, inconsiderate, and selfish only thinking for themselves. Most low wage workers in SFla are Haitians, and I can tell you the service is horrendous...No hello, thank you or anything else which would be considered some type of customer service. We have plenty out of work people here, and college kids who would be more than happy to take their jobs and smile while doing so. I say deport all of them.

maury970
maury970

I feel bad for the Haitian Community but the writer should write about the whole deportation process, because is the same for Central Americans and everybody else , they been doing that for years , how come now is only not fair for haitians ? , they had destroy families, living children without parents and now is only not fair for haitians ? This guy had a criminal record sowhat makes him extent of the law .

joseluis
joseluis

what about the Cuban people.

bknymia
bknymia

i have no compassion for deportees... just go the right way to become a citizen and you wouldn't be crying about being deported.

Jae
Jae

The real issue I have is that when they get deported they end up in Haitian jails. Since they already did their time in the US. The US should allow them to go to Haiti without handing them over to Haitian officials who always jailed them because the Haitian officials attitude is if the US can't handle you then you are a heinous criminal that need to be locked up.

The deportees should be allowed to go home to Haiti without the stigma because being a deportee because no one really wants to associate with you down there even family members especially if you were not helping them while you were living in the US. They should have the opportunity to go down there on their own without being jailed. immigration law is clear cut, once you're a convict or suspect of associating with terrorist you will be deported not ifs or buts about it. Obama administration won't change it because he wants to be reelected and don't want to seen to be soft on criminals. So instead of wasting money in lawyers, they should take that money and start their life over in Haiti. I know a couple of deportees who are successful business people in Haiti but I suppose if you were unproductive in the US then you're probably going to be worst off in Haiti. So going to Haiti itself is not a death sentence but ending up in a Haitian jail may be.

Jo
Jo

Well sir I'm truly sorry that you haven't met any real Haitians who take pride in their race and who know how to comport themselves in a cordial and utmost respectful manner. I am Haitian myself and trust me, there are some of us good Haitians out there. I was born and raised in New York City but nonetheless, I'm Haitian. In the near future I hope you meet an agreeable educated respectful Haitian.

Etienne417
Etienne417

you need to think of other people families before you say this. you have no heart and you are very selfish. your opinion is not needed either.

cleancut77
cleancut77

What Haiti decides to do with deportees is on them not the USA. The USA can suggest not order.

The law is clear, foreign nationals who commit felonies MUST be deported. Why should we shelter Haiti's criminals?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Then we should deport Cubans who have committed felonies. Yet we don't. Do you ever wonder why?

 
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