4

One Day In, Roger Stone's Criminal Trial Is Already a Circus

Roger Stone walks with his wife Nydia Stone and his legal team as he arrives for the first day of his trial in Washington, D.C.
Roger Stone walks with his wife Nydia Stone and his legal team as he arrives for the first day of his trial in Washington, D.C.
Photo by Drew Angerer / Getty Images
^
Keep New Times Free
I Support
  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism
  • logo

Support the independent voice of Miami and help keep the future of New Times free.

The courtroom spectacle in Washington, D.C., yesterday was peak Roger Stone. But did you expect anything else from the Florida Man MVP?

The first day of Stone's criminal trial — where he faces charges of witness tampering and making false statements to Congress — fittingly descended into a circus, cut short by health emergencies, protesters, and a 30-minute bathroom break by the defendant mere minutes into the proceedings. Only a handful of 80 potential jurors were interviewed before Judge Amy Berman Jackson called for a recess due to Stone's apparent food poisoning.

It was a scene straight out of the political comedy Veep as alt-right media personalities jostled for attention outside the courtroom and a spectator inside collapsed and was removed from the building on a stretcher.

Meanwhile, autographed rocks — Roger's stones — were being sold to fund his legal defense:

Stone, a longtime adviser to President Donald Trump and a self-anointed "dirty trickster," is charged with lying to Congress and obstructing its investigation into the 2016 presidential election. He was one of 34 people indicted during special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference and allegedly lied during his September 2017 congressional testimony about his prior knowledge of the hacking of the Democratic National Committee.

Not only did Stone know about the email hack of Hillary Clinton's campaign chair, John Podesta, but also he reportedly, on multiple occasions, told senior Trump campaign officials about the information in WikiLeaks' possession. He also allegedly told his associate Randy Credico to "Frank Pentangeli" during his congressional testimony, a reference to The Godfather character who gives false testimony to Congress after being threatened. Stone has denied all of the allegations.

Stone was arrested in January at his Fort Lauderdale home and faces 25 years in prison. His longtime business partner Paul Manafort was sentenced earlier this year to more than seven years behind bars. 

Keep Miami New Times Free... Since we started Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who've won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism's existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" membership program, allowing us to keep covering Miami with no paywalls.

We use cookies to collect and analyze information on site performance and usage, and to enhance and customize content and advertisements. By clicking 'X' or continuing to use the site, you agree to allow cookies to be placed. To find out more, visit our cookies policy and our privacy policy.

 

Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Miami.

 

Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Miami.