4

Micky Arison Out as CEO of Carnival Cruise Lines

^
Keep New Times Free
I Support
  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism
  • logo

Support the independent voice of Miami and help keep the future of New Times free.

Well, maybe he'll have more time to watch Heat games.

Less than a week after his NBA team won its third championship, Micky Arison finds himself out of a major job. Carnival Corporation announced today that Arison will be replaced as CEO by Arnold W. Donald. Arison has been the CEO of Carnival, the Doral-based company his father founded, since 1979. However, he will remain chairman of the board.

Though profits at the company are up this quarter, thanks largely to lower fuel costs, the company has weathered a number of PR crises in the past few years. Several ships have suffered from power outages and onboard fires. In one instance this February, known as "Poop Cruise 2013," a ship was left adrift in the Gulf of Mexico for five days with backed-up toilets. In January 2012, the Costa Concordia (owned by a Carnival subsidiary) capsized off the coast of Italy, killing 32 passengers. This has resulted in people remaining hesitant to book trips through the company.

Donald is the founder and former chairman of the board of the company that brought us Equal sweetener, and he had several high-level positions at Monsato. He has served as a director for Carnival since 2001. He's also the president and CEO of the Executive Leadership Council, a network of high-profile African-American business leaders.

Arison seems to be on board with the change.

"I have been discussing this with the board for some time now and feel the timing is right to align our company with corporate governance best practices," he said in a statement.

Arison also remains Carnival's largest shareholder.

Follow Miami New Times on Facebook and Twitter @MiamiNewTimes.

Keep Miami New Times Free... Since we started Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who've won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism's existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" membership program, allowing us to keep covering Miami with no paywalls.

We use cookies to collect and analyze information on site performance and usage, and to enhance and customize content and advertisements. By clicking 'X' or continuing to use the site, you agree to allow cookies to be placed. To find out more, visit our cookies policy and our privacy policy.

 

Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Miami.

 

Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Miami.