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| Sports |

Marlins' Opening-Day Game Delayed by Rain Despite That Retractable Roof

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Remember how the Miami Marlins spent hundreds of million of dollars to build a new stadium with a fancy retractable roof? Remember how one of the main selling points was the fact that it tends to rain a lot in South Florida, and playing in the roofless Sun Life Stadium caused numerous delays? 

Well, today is the first day of the new MLB season, and the Marlins have already become the butt of the baseball world's jokes by having the game delayed by rain — you know, despite having that high-tech roof. 

An unexpected squall moved over Little Havana this afternoon as the Marlins hosted the Atlanta Braves. The roof at Marlins Park is designed to close in 13 minutes, but the team didn't move fast enough despite the looming clouds. The rain hit just as the roof began to shut, and the umpire had to call a rain delay to wait for the roof to close.

Not only is it the first rain delay in Marlins Park history, but also Miami is the first team in MLB history to experience a rain delay in a stadium with a retractable roof. The Sun-Sentinel notes that owner Jeffrey Loria could be seen sitting in the stands with his head in his hands during the fiasco. 

The delay lasted 16 minutes, and to make matters worse, it happened during one of the Fish's rare sold-out crowds. 

Twitter, of course, couldn't help but laugh. 

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