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| Crime |

Karlie Tomica, Shelborne Hit-and-Run Driver, Was "Really Drunk," According to Witness

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Karlie Tomica was booked into jail yesterday after the car she was driving struck and killed a man outside the Shelborne South Beach on Collins Avenue. She might not have been found so quickly if a Good Samaritan hadn't followed her to an apartment building in Mid-Beach. Now, the witness's 911 call has been released, and he repeatedly says Tomica seems "really drunk."

See also:
- Terrazza Executive Chef Stefano Riccioletti Killed in Hit-and-Run
- Pedestrian Killed in Hit-and-Run in Front of Shelborne Hotel

"I'm actually just following a car that just hit a man on Collins Avenue. As far as I know, at this time, she must have killed him," says the unidentified witness in a 911 call, according to NBC Miami.

The man continued following the 2007 Dodge four-door that Tomica was driving while on the phone with the 911 operator.

"The lady is really drunk, she just came out of the car," he continues. "She's outside the car; she's really drunk."

The arrest report states she had slurred speech, reeked of the smell of alcohol, and wasn't able to walk stably. She refused a field sobriety test, but a blood sample was taken.

Tomica, reportedly a college student, was booked on charges of DUI and leaving the scene of an accident but was released less than eight hours later on $10,000 bond.

Her since-deleted Twitter profile described her as "Party Princess Miami Beach."

Meanwhile, the victim, 49-year-old Stefano Riccioletti, was pronounced dead on the scene.

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