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If You Hired a Hooker from Miami Companions Your Name and Sexual Preferences Just Got a Little Less Secret

Miami Companions had become one of the premier suppliers of high-class prostitutes in the country with a client base that allegedly included celebrities and men with high-up government connections. They were busted in July of last year, and a judge just ruled that a list of the names of clients who used the service can be released to the defense. Despite some fears the defense could use that list for nefarious purposes, the judge is trying to ensure that the list of clients isn't released to the press or public.

Greggory Carr, his ex-wife Laurie and three other employees, all based out of South Florida, were busted in July by Michigan authorities after it was uncovered they were doing pretty big business in prostitution in the Detroit area. Miami Connections apparently did business through out the world, including in South Florida, obviously, as an elite dating service but actually pimped out pretty girls and porn stars for as much as $500 an hour. In Miami, they often set up liaisons between girls and clients at rented beach houses.

Authorities has obtained a list of names of over 3,000 people who did business with the service, and the database even includes the sexual preferences of some of the clients. Laurie Carr has already entered a plea bargain and has agreed to testify against her ex. Yesterday, we wrote about an email she sent to TV producers soliciting the idea of a show based on her life and experiences that allegedly included details on a high-powered lobbyist and famous rock star that may or may not be true.

Greg is still set for trial, and his defense attorneys have sought a copy of the list on the grounds that they deserve to know what information prosecutors have on their client. One would assume that Carr would know of at least some clients, but it's unlikely that he remembers off hand all 3,000.

Prosecutors worried that the defense could use the information to threaten potential witnesses, or worse, leak it to the public.

Today, the judge in the case, U.S. District Judge Arthur Tarnow, ruled that Carr's attorneys can get a list of the clients but it comes with some catches.

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Reports The Detroit Free Press:

U.S. District Judge Arthur Tarnow said that attorney Paul DeCailly can get a copy of the computer disc that contains the client list, but he can't copy the disc, nor can he print out any information from it. Tarnow also ordered the U.S. Attorney's Office to come up with a way that would make the disc copy-proof.

The trial is scheduled to start in March and DeCailly says he won't use the list for any nefarious purposes and just wants to run background checks on potential witnesses before they hit the stand.

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