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Another Case of Florida Fraud Found After Felon Wore "I Voted" Sticker to Meet With Probation Officer

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Rick Scott's supposed plan to derail voter fraud in Florida resulted in nothing but long lines and the discovery of very little voter fraud. But now it seems there was at least one case of fraud in the past presidential election: a convicted felon wore an "I Voted" sticker to a meeting with her probation officer.

Onakia Lanet Griffin, 33, had previously been charged with wire fraud, identity theft, and using someone else's ID. Felons aren't allowed to vote in Florida unless they've had their voting rights restored. Griffin's convictions made her ineligible to vote.

That didn't stop her from registering and successfully voting during early voting on November 1 in Pompano Beach, according to the Sun-Sentinel.

And no one might have noticed if Griffin hadn't worn an "I Voted" sticker to a meeting with her probation officer. She admitted to the probation officer that she had indeed voted. An investigation found that she didn't indicate she had felony convictions on her voter registration. Nothing was flagged when her ID was scanned.

Griffin now faces charges of submitting false voter registration information, false swearing, and fraud in casting a vote.

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