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South Florida Acts at SXSW: Lazaro Casanova

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The long-haired, natty Lazaro Casanova got his start playing at the now-defunct old Malibu Grand Prix’s infamous Full Moon parties, int he Nineties. But he really became a local marquee name as the musical selector du jour for the main rooms indie-ish dance parties in Miami, most notably at the long-running, now-defunct Revolver. But when pressing play on White Stripes discs got boring, Casanova branched out on his own, at home. Tapping into the burgeoning underground dance scene when it was still in its infancy, Casanova cranked out filthy, searing bedroom remixes of that quickly virally spread across the Internet.

Luckily for him, Miami is also a place where DJs like to party semi-incognito, and eventually he met the guys of MSTRKRFT, who took a shine to him. They recruited him for a national tour, and soon he was playing sizzling, electroey-housey sets, heavily featuring his own chunky, thumping compositions. Since then, he’s become a sort of unofficial third arm of that outfit, rocking crowds of thousands across the world. He still manages to update his blog, Shot Callin’, with the latest white-hot dance music, and his first official EP is in the works. – Arielle Castillo

Saturday, March 15 9:00 p.m.

Vice (302 E 6th St, Austin, TX)

Here's a clip of Laz Casanova playing at Personal Fest last December in Buenos Aires.

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