Jorge Sedano is a loudmouthed Miami Cuban (we know that's redundant) with a morning sports/talk radio show on 790 AM. He and his crew come from the Dan Le Batard school of broadcasting, where pop-culture side talk is just as important to the show as the sports talk they feature. Sedano deals heavily in obscure movie and TV references, rap music, and offbeat interviews. He has talked American conspiracies with Minnesota wackjob Jesse Ventura, pissed off the U with Cocaine Cowboys producer Billy Corben, and let athletes play with Miami legend Uncle Luke. He has also interviewed Carlton from The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Topanga from Boy Meets World, and Alyssa Milano. So when we say Sedano's show proudly features Q&As with some of the most recognizable stars of the '80s, we also mean Hammer, Ernie Hudson, and Chuck Norris. But sports are king, and Sedano talks about them 24-7 not only on the radio but also on Facebook, Twitter, his show blog, podcasts, and videos. He was even featured by the BBC on Tim Westwood's show explaining a Miami Super Bowl to the entire UK. He also features comics, and the day he interviewed Lisa Lampanelli, he ended with, "That was one big curse fest and one big sexual orgy on AM radio." Keep up the good work, Sedano.
Her rock-gray back snake-winds through the green life on a shark's path through this sacred, ancient land. Every segment of humanity Miami has ever hosted has recognized her as a transport route. Tequestas, pirates, pioneers, settlers, farmers, builders, artists, killers, doctors, liars, cocaine cowfolk, and suburban homeowners have all staked claims along her highway. Today this engineer's line through Coconut Grove is as lush as a jungle in a concrete landscape. The sun glows through the hot, wet air, lighting up the branches of the canopy with a luminance resplendent in the dusk.
In an ocean of fiery morning-radio clatter, Bernadette Pardo is a cool, unwavering presence. Her direct approach to local news keeps listeners informed, proving there's still a place for serious journalism on the AM dial. Coming from a family of respected journalists, Pardo gets to the bottom of the daily events. From 9 to 11 a.m. Monday through Friday, Pardo (along with cohost Jose A. Almora) brings Miami up-to-date while giving our extreme local events a level-headed analysis.
Founded in 2008 by local boy Andy Blazquez and Icelandic filmmaker Ingi Larusson, Life.is attempts to capture everything that makes Miami cool without selling out or looking to the old and tired Magic City tastemakers. Instead, with the help of local hipsterati member Barbie Bertisch, the duo captures the city's essence through decidedly apt text, video, and photography. "We are trying to boost Miami's local talent, whether it be art, music, fashion, or film through the site," Bertisch explains. Life.is has already profiled the likes of Danny Daze, Pirate Stereo, Alexis Mincolla, and Panic Bomber. Expect even bigger things this year — Bertisch vows the site will continue to showcase the city's talent using an array of media that makes Life.is much more than your average amateur blog.
If you've ever ventured into Doral, you've probably had to brave the nauseating, car-sickening, I-just-want-to-get-out-of-my-car and-stab-someone traffic, especially on Doral Boulevard, AKA 36th Street, AKA 41st Street (maybe the confusing three names have something to do with its madness?). So do three other factors: insane construction on adjacent streets, which draws escaping traffic to the boulevard; the proximity of Doral Academy (elementary, middle, and high school), which jams the street with a sea of parents, guardians, big brothers, sisters, and abuelos dropping off and picking up the kids; and the omnipresence of police officers filling their quota of fines. So avoid Doral Boulevard, because attempting to drive on it will cause you to commit some random act of vehicular violence.
Sometimes the information superhighway needs a roadmap, and the South Florida Daily Blog is just that, pinpointing all the best posts Miami's blogosphere has to offer, while adding its own info into the mix. Run by the semi-anonymous Rick, the frequently updated blog is the biggest cheerleader of other local bloggers, offering twice-daily highlights of their work as well as awards for best posts of the week and month. Of course, SFDB isn't just the cyber equivalent of a den mother handing out gold stars so everyone feels good about themselves. Like all the best bloggers, Rick has a strong point of view and a bit of bite, never shying away from controversy with other bloggers. Just ask Babalu or Carlos Miller. Rick's political posts, usually of the leftist persuasion, might not be for everyone, but his highlight of local weird news and other Internet LOLs certainly are.
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For locals, the thought of downtown Miami conjures visions of our mega arena, contemporary skyscrapers, and the 17-story Spanish-style building that holds more history than all of its steel neighbors combined: the Freedom Tower. The building's ornate details, intricate points, and curves reminiscent of the Giralda Tower of Seville, along with pale peach and yellow tones, provide a stark contrast to the surrounding sea of modernism. Constructed in 1925, the building is Miami's version of Ellis Island. Between 1962 and 1974, the former home of the Miami Daily News became el refugio, a U.S. immigration station for Cuban refugees flooding South Florida. Today the National Historic Landmark is part of the Miami Dade College Wolfson Campus and is used for events and exhibitions. So next time you're downtown and see Dwyane Wade's face shining on the arena's three-story-high LED screen, turn around, stand proud, and soak up Miami's ultimate landmark. To get a closer look, visit the tower Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 7 p.m., or call for a private tour. Most art exhibitions are free.
It seems obvious, but the secret is there are some hidden gems in the Collins Park area that few motorists bother to look for. Like the fact that after the Bass Museum of Art is closed, you can park after midnight for free in the small lot on Park Avenue near the gift shop. Most drivers worry they'll get towed, but rest assured you won't. Also hidden are the two public lots on 23rd Street across from the Plum TV offices and AeroBar. Both are small and easily forgotten if it weren't for the public-parking signs. If all else fails, most of the curbside spaces around the museum, library, and Miami City Ballet are available, and thank the parking gods that the public lot between the W South Beach and the Days Inn has reopened.
Many people familiar with 31-year-old Alfred Spellman probably don't realize the wealth of knowledge and topics that the Rakontur producer (Cocaine Cowboys, The U) frequently tweets. While most Twitter users babble about nonsense on the social networking tool, in 140 characters or fewer, Spellman lets us know about inner happenings at Rakontur (FYI, Dawg Fight, the back-yard fighter documentary based on a 2008 New Times story, comes out this fall) and comments on drug-related news and general Miami fucked-up-ness.Choice tweets include:"wonder where this guy's headed: Former Nazi and convicted child molester dies in Chile at 88 (New York Times)""Electric Pickle, why'd you have to cross the picket line and let Jersey Shore shoot?""keepin it classy, GOP ——> Republican congressman shouts 'baby killer' at Stupak on House floor during vote."
When the county mayor holds up one of your emails at a news conference to rail at your alleged "bias" for exposing him and his inner circle for feeding at the trough when he's cutting services, it's a nice feather in any reporter's cap. Matt Haggman, who holds a law degree, worked his way up in Miami's infinitely small print-newspaper industry. He started out writing about lawyers at the Daily Business Review before moving on to the Miami Herald, where he toiled in the business section. In 2008, he was one of three reporters on the daily's ground-breaking series about rampant mortgage fraud called "Borrowers Betrayed." Buyouts and layoffs finally prompted the Herald's editors to give him a beat where he has really blossomed as a daily reporter. If you want to know what's going on at county hall, read Haggman.

Best Of Miami®

Best Of Miami®