Save Bosco Enriquez, Part 3

Chad MacDonald, a 17-year-old who snitched to cops about a meth dealer, was tortured and then executed in Los Angeles. Rachel Morningstar Hoffman, a pretty 23-year-old redhead from Palm Harbor, Florida, who loved to cook, was fatally shot in the head after she tried to help officers round up two guys selling Ecstasy and handguns.

And Bosco Enriquez, whom Miami police wired with a microphone at barely 15 years old to end a Latin gang's reign of terror in Miami, was beaten, sexually assaulted, and dispatched to Central America. These days, he lolls around his aunt's home on the shore of Lake Nicaragua while trawling the Internet, reading the Bible, and battling anguish.

"My Spanish isn't really that good, and there are no jobs here," he says. "It's hard. Right now, I pretty much stay home. I don't go out. I don't party. My aunt will be leaving in a month, and I won't have anywhere to live."

Over the past couple of weeks, I've told Bosco's tale of youthful malfeasance, redemption, drug addiction, and exile. He became one of the youngest members of the fearsome International Posse in the 1990s; then, when things got too hot, he approached police and offered information that resulted in at least 20 gang busts.

His horror story is emblematic of a bigger problem that lawmakers in Florida and across the nation have only recently begun to recognize: Cops employ confidential informants — sometimes very young ones — to bust criminals. But there's little oversight, and the result of police carelessness can be horrific.

That point was made frighteningly clear in a 1997 deposition in the case of International Posse kingpin Anastacio Villanueva, whom Bosco helped bring down. The teen's handler, Miami-Dade gang strike force officer Gadyaces Serralta, was candid before blurting out the name of his undercover informant.

"Bosco Enriquez, B-O-S-C-O...," Serralta said. "If you give up that name tomorrow, you can get that guy killed."

Perhaps Serralta didn't know that depositions are public information, so those whom the teen had ratted out could easily find his name in a court file. Or maybe he did. It's difficult to say. Serralta wouldn't discuss the case.

Says one Miami-Dade detective: "Informants always get you in trouble. They have their own issues. You just have to deal with them."

After feeding police intel to help arrest 16 gang members in a 1997 sweep, Enriquez repeatedly tried to clean up his life. He worked as a manager at a Denny's, a part-time bartender, and a sous chef at a Kendall eatery called Puerto Madero. He dropped out of school but then earned his GED. Charges were filed and then dropped when he tried to buy some marijuana in 1998.

Then, on January 19, 2001, he was arrested at SW 220th Street and 112th Avenue after he dropped a bag with four crack rocks out of a car window. He spent a day in jail — the first time he had been behind bars — before posting bond. Four months later, he pleaded guilty to a third-degree felony. The judge required him to attend drug treatment and pay $476 in court fees. "My lawyer at the time said I should take the plea," he says. "That crack wasn't mine. That guilty plea was probably the biggest mistake of my life."

Though he kicked his drug habit soon after that arrest, it would serve as the basis for his expulsion from the United States. "I was scared, always scared in those years," Enriquez says. "My past was never far away. Everyone knew what happened. It would come up. Fights would start. I don't even remember them all."

Enriquez broke his nose in one of those brawls in 2001 and again soon after that. One evening, he came home to find his parents and little brother frightened silly. Gunshots had been fired at the front of the family's house. His mom and dad thought it was Villanueva, who had again been released from jail. There was no proof, though, so they didn't report it to the cops.

On April 28, 2010, Bosco was arrested for walking out of a Marshall's in North Miami-Dade wearing a pair of shoes worth $399 "without even making an attempt to pay," according to a police report. When authorities checked the records and found the 2001 felony record, they began deportation proceedings. "It's a stupid story. It was my birthday and I had a few drinks," Enriquez says. "I had the money."

Authorities sent him first to the Krome Detention Center and then to the Glades County immigration prison, where two men sexually molested him, he says. (Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokesman Nestor Yglesias would not comment on the case.)

Finally, on June 28, 2011, Enriquez left for Nicaragua, where he has been living with an aunt and pondering his fate ever since.

"[The police] conned me into doing this, and I put my life on the line on seven or eight occasions," he says. "I wore a wire and they paid me $150. That was it. But what really makes me angry is that they didn't help me when I was thrown out of the country. I asked them, and they said there was nothing they could do."

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12 comments
kerby.rok
kerby.rok

Fuk metro dade with a fat baby dick

Katz
Katz

the other side of the coin are "professional" [i.e. career criminals with complete immunity to prosecution] paid informants who are able to set people up in phony investigations and have them serially victimized when whatever wouldn't have happened unless contrived scenarios of pseudo busts don't work. They get away with murder and the destruction of peoples lives without fear of reprisal and the "agents involved have their agencies to cover them and the situation up "for fear of lawsuits" [if they were that concerned the cases wouldn't have happened in the first place or they'd deal with their criminals in their agencies and area] that's a major problem in Calif and could be here too. Not sure if Fl. allows and covers up people id being used illegally, falsifying testimony, etc and so on

Moecamel
Moecamel

The article was very sad and misconfigered the press enjoys twisting the truth and lieng to the public bosco and his cousin are always carry a trophy for winning in life whether its here or in nicaragua god bless old friends to you and your families

Pingaso
Pingaso

i know this nigga personally. hung with him everyday doing gang shit. some of this article is acurrate, most is not. but nobody made him steal shoes, which according to the writer is what got him deported. this man introduced me to crack. i still struggle with addiction to this day. bosco was hated before, after this article.......do you really want o come back? good riddance.

Eliandjay1119
Eliandjay1119

Hey chuck, did he think about the daughter or other children that he left fatherless for years if not forever? F*+#-&k! Him!........Oh ish, my bad, they did F#$%&&K HIM.

Ballin
Ballin

Suks. What comes around goes around. Would feel bad if I didn't know the whole story, but shit he did he didn't have to. Like my man rick James said. "COCAINES A HELL OF A DRUG". Just greatful he didn't take me down with him.

Mannyfreshhhhh
Mannyfreshhhhh

I can't help but feel bad for this guy but honestly how can you blame the 'system' for your poor choices. Yes, you helped take down gangs and all but in the end it was your own stupid decisions that got you where you're at. You have no one to blame but yourself!!

<< Work at home, $60/h, link
<< Work at home, $60/h, link

In the education of children there is nothing like alluring the interest and affection, otherwise you only make so many asses laden with books.

ash.trinidad9387
ash.trinidad9387

@Pingaso i dont understand you say you know this neggah personally and that yall kicked it back in the day, but now you hate the man? cmon dude as us juggalos say, fam is fam regardless. he had a family to worry about, dont that mean anything to you?

ash.trinidad9387
ash.trinidad9387

@Mannyfreshhhhh our system is flawed, and dont give two fucks about us regular citizens. i live in hialeah and ive seen first hand how corrupt hialeah cops can be. our system just lets things ride and dont care who it affects. yeah the man screwed up, but he was a kid. everyone deserves a second chance. he tried doing the right thing and we fucked him in the end. think about it

 
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