Openings

ROK:BRGR to Open in South Miami

Looks like the South Miami/Coral Gables area is becoming a hotspot for burger joints and gastropubs with ROK:BRGR Burger Bar + Gastropub announcing a late summer opening.

ROK:BRGR is already a popular eatery in Fort Lauderdale, and owner Mark Falsetto is expanding the popular concept, with plans to open in South Miami, followed by Delray Beach in 2013. Falsetto also intends to open a ROK:BRGR in Orlando in the future, followed by more restaurants down the road.

ROK:BRGR's menu features oversized burger made with premium meats. Burger lovers can choose from sandwiches made with certified Angus prime or American wagyu "Kobe" from Snake River Farms.  Turkey burgers and veggie burgers are also available.


All this good meat doesn't come cheap. Burgers start at $10 for the classic,

made with a 10-oz. certified Angus patty, yellow American cheese,

lettuce, tomato, red onion and pickle on a sesame bun. The "King"

burger, made with "Kobe" brie, roasted tomatoes, caramelized onions, and

chipolte aioli goes for $16. The priciest burger is the Prime Burger,

made with 10 oz certified Angus prime, four year aged Vermont cheddar,

hickory smoked bacon, and bourbon BBQ sauce, tops out at $18. These

prices, by the way, are based on the current Fort Lauderdale menu. The

Miami menu will feature the same items, though it's unconfirmed whether

the prices will stay the same.


In addition to burgers, ROK:BRGR will feature a full menu of pub-centric

foods including a lobster corn dog, "Kobe" hot dogs, and poutine. A

full-service bar will feature 60 beers and 45 bourbons.


ROK:BRGR will feature seating for 144. Owner Falsetto, who took over the

old Segafredo space at 5800 SW 73rd Street just off US-1, is going for a

"1920's Chicago post-prohibition vibe." The dining room will feature

exposed brick, Edison lights, and an enlarged terrace with fire pits for

al fresco dining.



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Laine Doss is the food and spirits editor for Miami New Times. She has been featured on Cooking Channel's Eat Street and Food Network's Great Food Truck Race. She won an Alternative Weekly award for her feature about what it's like to wait tables.
Contact: Laine Doss