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Mexican Restaurant Lolo's Surf Cantina Debuts Daily Breakfast

The Mazunte styleEXPAND
The Mazunte style
Courtesy of Deep Sleep Studio
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Lolo’s Surf Cantina, a Baja-inspired Mexican restaurant in Miami Beach's South of Fifth neighborhood, is now open for breakfast.

The early-morning menu is inspired by chef/partner Richard Ampudia's grandmother, Dolores, for whom the restaurant is named. The fare is a mixture of classic Mexican breakfast dishes with lighter and more conventional items.

Some of the spot's most popular breakfast plates are the huevos rancheros, soft tortillas layered with sunny-side-up eggs, salsa, and crema cheese and served with tater tots and greens ($14); butterscotch pancakes garnished with caramelized banana and maple pecans ($14); and the Melbourne avocado toast, smeared with chunky guacamole and topped with a poached egg ($14).

Huevos rancherosEXPAND
Huevos rancheros
Courtesy of Deep Sleep Studio

Other traditional Mexican items include the Mazunte style, where spicy chicken tostadas are coated with black beans, avocado, and sunny-side-up eggs ($13), and a breakfast burrito stuffed with potatoes, bacon, rice, and scrambled eggs ($15).

Lighter options include a granola parfait mixed with berries, mango, coconut, pumpkin seeds, and agave ($10); a watermelon salad topped with mint, lime, and queso fresco ($8); and the Malibu style, in which two poached eggs are placed on a bed of greens, crisp quinoa, and vegetables ($13).

Customers can also opt for a build-your-own omelet ($17) or a continental breakfast, one of the menu's best-valued plates, served with two eggs, potatoes, greens, fruit, yogurt, a croissant with jam, and coffee or tea ($12).

Watermelon salad with queso frescoEXPAND
Watermelon salad with queso fresco
Courtesy of Deep Sleep Studio

Between bites, sip libations such as mimosas, bloody marys, or belindas, a blend of peach juice and prosecco. Nonalcoholic drinks include the hibiscus aqua fresca, mixed with fruit water, hibiscus, and cranberry, and horchata, sweet rice milk with cinnamon.

Ampudia, often referred to as the “godfather of Mexican street food,” and Plan Do See, a global hospitality brand based in Japan, are behind the beachside space, which opened in January inside the recently refurbished Stanton South Beach Hotel. Lourdes Herman, a Mexican native who has worked at the Setai, 1 Hotel South Beach, and R House, helms the kitchen as Ampudia's chef de cuisine.

Lolo's Surf Cantina. 161 Ocean Dr., Miami Beach; 305-735-6973; loloscantina.com. Breakfast daily 6:30 to 11 a.m.; lunch and dinner daily 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; bar till 1 a.m.

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