4

Archive Diver: Tiger Tiger Teahouse and Trip Wire Bombing

^
Keep New Times Free
I Support
  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism
  • logo

Support the independent voice of Miami and help keep the future of New Times free.

Tiger Tiger Teahouse opened on Biscayne Boulevard in 1969. The restaurant then moved to South Miami, the location the ad at right advertises, closed for a year, and then reopened on the 79th street causeway in North Bay Village.

A 1992 Miami New Times review of the restaurant at its 79th Street location by Jen Karetnick said "The food itself epitomized poor preparation from a disinterested kitchen. And time seemed to stand still."

Woah, harsh.

Even worse, in 1996, 40-year-old Chef Gouquiang Situ, a Chinese immigrant who had worked his way up from dishwasher to head of the Tiger Tiger kitchen, was killed walking home from work while carrying take-out soup and Chinese newspapers.

In a mysterious case documented by the New York Times the chef was killed by a bomb blast set off by a trip wire strung between a metal bus shelter and a chainlink fence near WSVN Channel 7. At the time of the incident no motive or suspect was determined.

Anybody have any other Tiger Tiger Teahouse memories?

Keep Miami New Times Free... Since we started Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who've won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism's existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" membership program, allowing us to keep covering Miami with no paywalls.

We use cookies to collect and analyze information on site performance and usage, and to enhance and customize content and advertisements. By clicking 'X' or continuing to use the site, you agree to allow cookies to be placed. To find out more, visit our cookies policy and our privacy policy.

 

Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Miami.

 

Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Miami.