4
| Columns |

Wyclef Jean: Dirty Dozen 2010

^
Keep New Times Free
I Support
  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism
  • logo

Support the independent voice of Miami and help keep the future of New Times free.

Each year, New Times puts together a list of the sketchiest

politicians and unholiest celebrities and weirdest human beings to call

the Magic City home. So who made the filthy cut this year? We're

releasing the names one by one ahead of next week's issue, which comes

with a full-page illustration of the dynamic dozen.

Like the dreaded vuvuzelas blasting through his first campaign ad, Wyclef Jean's transition from beloved ex-Fugee to would-be Haitian politician sounded a sour note from the start. And that was before the really gnarly news started leaking: Wyclef owes millions to the IRS; Wyclef paid his mistress to run his charity; and, most disgusting of all, Wyclef used Yéle Haiti, his foundation, to pad his own pockets. By the time he was ruled ineligible to run for president, 'clef had lost a lot more than his political career. That's not a vuvuzela, pal, it's the sound of a reputation gone to mush.

Previous dirty denizens of Miami for 2010 include:

Jennifer Lopez
Rick Scott
Carlos Alvarez and Norman Braman
Bill Parcells
George Alan Rekers
Jeffrey Loria
Capri Anderson
Kat Stacks

Follow Miami New Times on Facebook and Twitter @MiamiNewTimes.

Keep Miami New Times Free... Since we started Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who've won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism's existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" membership program, allowing us to keep covering Miami with no paywalls.

We use cookies to collect and analyze information on site performance and usage, and to enhance and customize content and advertisements. By clicking 'X' or continuing to use the site, you agree to allow cookies to be placed. To find out more, visit our cookies policy and our privacy policy.

 

Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Miami.

 

Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Miami.