Humor

Miami TV's Jenny Scordamaglia Has Perfected the Nip Slip (NSFW)

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On a mid-August night last year, the cameras of a new online entertainment channel called Miami TV descended upon Bike Fest South Beach. Enter Scordamaglia: The station's face, she is squeezed into a miniskirt that shows half her ass and a button-up plaid shirt that hangs open, revealing that she wears no bra. The camera follows closely as she approaches a burly man in a white cut-off top. Together, they admire his bike, while others admire something else.

In the middle of Scordamaglia's brief interview — bam! — nip slip. Minutes later, there it is again. Unfazed, she finishes the interview, and the man in the cut-off top gushes, "Thank you! Thank all of you!"

The YouTube video soon lapped up 700,000 page views.

Though it's not unusual for this sort of thing to happen occasionally to those in the public eye — hello, Janet Jackson — it happens nearly every night for Scordamaglia. The nip slip is the defining element of her on-camera presence. In appearance after appearance, she moves through gaggles of gawking bystanders, microphone in hand, nipples flashing like lighthouses in the night.

The brazen behavior has apparently paid off. In a city of beautiful, tanned women, she's gotten noticed. Dozens of her YouTube videos — many of which you have to verify your age to view — have attracted hundreds of thousands of clicks, and she's collected nearly 45,000 followers on Twitter. Miami TV, she says, lures viewers from locales as far-flung as Brazil, Russia, and parts of Africa.

"I mean," she says, "it's just a body. It's just anatomy. These are just nipples."

That's true. But it's also more calculated than that.

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Terrence McCoy