Media

Gerald Posner Plagiarized in Why America Slept and Secrets of the Kingdom, Research Shows

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Washington Post, January 20, 2002:

At a Jan. 10 meeting in the Tank, the secure conference room of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, President-elect Bush and his defense team took their first briefing from Gen. Henry H. Shelton, the chairman, and the four service chiefs.

"Why America Slept," pg 152:

In a January 10, 2001, meeting in the Tank, the secure conference room of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, President-elect Bush and his defense team met the Joint Chiefs for their first complete briefing.

Business Week, 1995:

By 1989, Alwaleed was snapping up shares of Citicorp, Chase Manhattan, Manufacturers Hanover and Chemical, sometimes calling in buy orders from a cellular phone while horseback riding in the desert. Within months, he had spent close to $250 million--at one point holding a 2.3% stake in Chase."

"Secrets of the Kingdom," pg 150:

He began acquiring shares of Chase Manhattan, Citibank, Manufacturers Hanover, and Chemical Bank. Sometimes he called in buy orders from a cellular phone while horseback riding in the desert. Within months, he had spent close to $250 million--at one point owning 2.3 percent of Chase.

Middle East Intelligence Bulletin September 2002:

Al-Walid was born in 1957 to Prince Talal bin Abdulaziz, one of the many sons of the late King Abdulaziz, and Mona al-Solh, the daughter of Lebanon's first post-independence prime minister, Riad al-Solh.

"Secrets of the Kingdom," pg 147:

Al-Waleed was born in 1957 to Prince Talal bin Abdul Aziz, one of the many sons of the late King Ibn Saud, and Mona al-Solh, the daughter of Lebanon's first postindependence prime minister, Riad al-Solh.

From the same story:

During his stay in Cairo, he declared himself a socialist and broadcast anti-Saudi radio propaganda, earning the nickname "the Red Prince."

Secrets of the Kingdom, page 148:

He left for Cairo, where he declared himself a socialist and broadcast anti-Saudi radio propaganda, earning the nickname "the Red Prince."

Same story:

Days later, in an interview with a Saudi newspaper, Al-Walid blamed Giuliani's decision on "Jewish pressures."

Secrets of the Kingdom pg 156:

Days later, in an interview with a Saudi newspaper, he blamed Giuliani's decision on "Jewish pressures."

Same story:

By April 1998, after Citicorp announced plans to merge with Travelers, the value of Al-Walid's stake in the company (now called Citigroup) had climbed to $7.6 billion.

Secrets of the Kingdom pg 151:

By April 1998, after Citibank announced plans to merge with Travelers, the value of Al-Waleed's under-$1-billion stake in the company (now called Citigroup) had climbed to $7.6 billion.

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Tim Elfrink is a former investigative reporter and managing editor for Miami New Times. He has won the George Polk Award and was a finalist for the Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting.
Contact: Tim Elfrink