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Gerald Posner Plagiarized in Why America Slept and Secrets of the Kingdom, Research Shows

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New York Times, September 17 2003:

According to a summary of the meeting written by a Hamas official, Mr. Mishaal and other Hamas representatives thanked their Saudi hosts for continuing "to send aid to the people through the civilian and popular channels, despite all the American pressures exerted on them."

Secrets of the Kingdom pg 180:

According to a summary of the meeting written by a Hamas official, Mishaal and other Hamas representatives thanked their Saudi hosts for continuing "to send aid to the people through the civilian and popular channels, despite all the American pressures exerted on them ..."

From the same story:

At least 50 percent of Hamas's current operating budget of about $10 million a year comes from people in Saudi Arabia, according to estimates by American law enforcement officials, American diplomats in the Middle East and Israeli officials. After the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, the Saudi portion of Hamas financing grew larger as donations from the United States, Europe and other Persian Gulf countries dried up ...

"Secrets of the Kingdom," pg 180:

At least 50 percent of Hamas's current operating budget of about $10 million a year comes from Saudi contributions, according to estimates by American law enforcement officials, diplomats in the Middle East, and Israeli officials. After 9/11, the Saudi portion of Hamas funding actually grew as donations from America, Europe, and other Persian Gulf countries dried up.

National Review Online, December 17 2001:

In late May, independent counsel Kenneth Starr had convicted Jim and Susan McDougal and Jim Guy Tucker in the first big Whitewater trial; in June, the Filegate story first broke into public view, and Sen. Alphonse D'Amato issued his committee's Whitewater report recommending that several administration officials be investigated for perjury.

It was also in June that the White House went into full battle mode against a variety of allegations contained in Unlimited Access, a book by former FBI agent Gary Aldrich."

Why America Slept pg 109:

In late May, independent counsel Kenneth Starr had convicted Jim and Susan McDougal and Jim Guy Tucker in connection with the first large Whitewater trial; in June, the Filegate story first broke publicly, and Senator Al D'Amato's committee issued its Whitewater report recommending that several administration officials be investigated for perjury.

Also in June, the White House went on the defensive from scurrilous, and mostly unproven, allegations contained in Unlimited Access, a book by former FBI agent Gary Aldrich.

From the same story:

... in the Khobar investigation. Morris found that the number of people who believed Clinton was "doing all he can to investigate the Saudi bombing and punish those responsible" was just 54 percent, while 32 percent believed he could do more. Morris feared that White House inaction would allow Dole to portray Clinton as soft on national security. "We tested two alternative defenses to this attack: Peace maker or Toughness," Morris wrote in a memo for the president. In the "Peacemaker" defense, Morris asked voters to respond to the statement, "Clinton is peacemaker. Brought together Arabs and Israelis. Ireland. Bosnia cease fire. Uses strength to bring about peace." The other defense, "Toughness," asked voters to respond to "Clinton tough. Stands up for American interests. Against foreign companies doing business in Cuba. Sanctions against Iran. Anti-terrorist legislation held up by Republicans. Prosecuted World Trade Center bombers." Morris found that the public greatly preferred "Toughness." So Clinton talked tough.

Why America Slept pg 113:

... handling of the Khobar investigation. The number who believed Clinton was "doing all he can to investigate the Saudi bombing and punish those responsible" was down to 54 percent, while 32 percent believed he could do more. Morris feared that further White House inaction would create a chance for Dole to carve out an issue portraying Clinton as soft on national security. "We tested two alternative defenses to this attack, 'Peace-maker' or 'Toughness,' " Morris wrote in a memo to the president. For the "Peacemaker" thesis, Morris asked voters to respond to the statement, "Clinton is peacemaker. Brought together Arabs and Israelis. Ireland. Bosnia ceasefire. Uses strength to bring about peace." The other position was presented as "Toughness. Clinton tough. Stands up for American interests. Against foreign companies doing business in Cuba. Sanctions against Iran. Anti-terrorist legislation held up by Republicans. Prosecuted World Trade Center bombers." People overwhelmingly preferred the "tough" view. "So Clinton talked tough," recalled Morris.

Business Week, October 15, 2001:

But he also gave $6 million to Palestinians thrown out of work by the intifada, and he helped reconstruct Lebanese power plants destroyed by the Israeli air force.

"Secrets of the Kingdom," pg 156:

He also gave $6 million to Palestinians thrown out of work by the Intifada, and helped reconstruct Lebanese power plants destroyed by the Israeli air force.

U.S. News & World Report, December 7, 2003:

... these were not charities in the sense that Americans understand the term. The Muslim World League and the IIRO, for example, are overseen by the grand mufti of Saudi Arabia, the kingdom's highest religious authority. They receive substantial funds from the government and members of the royal family and make use of the Islamic affairs offices of Saudi embassies abroad. The Muslim World League's current secretary general, Abdullah Al-Turki, served as the kingdom's minister of Islamic affairs for six years. "The Muslim World League, which is the mother of IIRO, is a fully government-funded organization," the IIRO's Canadian head testified in a 1999 court case. "In other words, I work for the government of Saudi Arabia."

"Secrets of the Kingdom," pg 167:

These are not charities in the sense that Americans understand the term. The Muslim World League and the International Islamic Relief Organization (IIRO), for example, are overseen by the grand mufti, the Kingdom's highest religious authority. Both the government and royals substantially fund them, and they utilize the Islamic affairs offices of Saudi embassies abroad. "The Muslim World League, which is the mother of IIRO, is a fully government-funded organization," the IIRO's Canadian chief testified in a 1999 court case. "In other words, I work for the government of Saudi Arabia."

Newsweek, April 12, 2004:

The probe also has uncovered large wire transfers overseas by the Saudi ambassador to the United States, Prince Bandar bin Sultan. The transactions recently prompted the Saudi Embassy's longtime bank, the Riggs Bank of Washington, D.C., to drop the Saudis as a client after embassy officials were "unable to provide an explanation that was satisfying," says a source familiar with the discussions.

"Secrets of the Kingdom," pg 177:

The probe also has uncovered large wire transfers overseas by the Saudi ambassador to the United States, Prince Bandar bin Sultan. The transactions recently prompted the Saudi embassy's longtime bank, the Riggs Bank of Washington, D.C., to drop the Saudis as a client after embassy officials were "unable to provide an explanation that was satisfying," says a source familiar with the discussions. ...

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Tim Elfrink is a former investigative reporter and managing editor for Miami New Times. He has won the George Polk Award and was a finalist for the Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting.
Contact: Tim Elfrink