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Gerald Posner Plagiarized in Why America Slept and Secrets of the Kingdom, Research Shows

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Gelembiuk's review of Posner's work also turned up twelve sources that Posner does cite in his two books, but that he takes extensive language from without using quote marks to indicate that he didn't write the passages.

As the 2003 edition of the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers notes "Presenting an author's exact wording without marking it as a quotation is plagiarism, even if you cite the source."

Here are those cases, again hyperlinked to the original stories:

St Petersberg Times, July 21, 2002:

At Herfy's, a Saudi-owned chain of fast-food restaurants, the booths in the "family section" are curtained. That way women can eat without being seen by male customers. When parents in Riyadh want to take their kids out for an evening of fun, the men might head to the kingdom's only ice skating rink. No women are allowed ...

Even marriage ceremonies, typically held in rented wedding halls, are segregated. The groom enjoys dinner with his male friends and relatives in one room, while the bride and her female guests dine and dance in another.

The only time bride and groom get together is to pose for wedding pictures with the immediate family. Saudi women have far fewer rights than men. They can't drive or travel abroad without a husband's permission. Daughters can inherit only half as much as sons, and a woman's testimony is given only half the weight of a man's in court.

"Secrets of the Kingdom," pg. 31:

At Herfy's, a Saudi-owned chain of fast-food restaurants, the booths in the "family section" are curtained so women can eat without being seen by male customers.

When parents in Riyadh take their children out for an evening, the men might head to the country's only ice-skating rink. No women are allowed. Even marriage ceremonies, usually held in rented wedding halls, are segregated. The groom enjoys dinner with his male friends and relatives in one room, while the bride and her female guests dine and dance in another. Bride and groom only get together to pose for wedding pictures with their families.

Saudi women can't travel abroad without a husband's permission. Daughters can inherit only half as much as sons, and a woman's testimony is given only half the weight of a man's in court.

"Who Really Wants to Invade Saudi Arabia, and Why?," Center for Research on Globalization, July 2004:

... Robert Tucker, US intelligence and military analyst, wrote an article for Commentary magazine, owned by the Jewish American Committee, entitled Oil: The Issue of American Intervention.

Tucker stated that, "without intervention there is a distinct possibility of an economic and political disaster bearing resemblance to the disaster of 1930s The Arab shoreline of the Gulf is a new El Dorado waiting for its conquistadors." And this was followed in February of the same year by an article in Harper's Magazine by a Pentagon analyst using a pseudonym, Miles Ignotus, emphasizing the need for the US to seize Saudi oilfields, installations and airports ...

Further, in August of 1975, a report entitled, Oil Fields as Military Objectives: A Feasibility Study, was produced for the Committee on Foreign Relations. In this report, the CRS stated that potential targets for the US included Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Venezuela, Libya, and Nigeria. Analysis indicates [that military forces of OPEC countries were] quantitatively and qualitatively inferior [and] could be swiftly crushed.

"Secrets of the Kingdom," pg 120:

Robert Tucker, a U.S. intelligence and military analyst, wrote an article for Commentary magazine, owned by the Jewish American Committee, titled "Oil: The Issue of American Intervention." Tucker contended that "without intervention there is a distinct possibility of an economic and political disaster bearing . . . resemblance to the disaster of [the] 1930s. . . . The Arab shoreline of the Gulf is a new El Dorado waiting for its conquistadors." And this was followed in February by an article called "Seizing Arab Oil" in Harper's, written by a Pentagon analyst using a pseudonym, Miles Ignotus. He argued that there was an urgent need to seize Saudi oil fields, installations, and airports.

Further, in August 1975, a study titled "Oil Fields as Military Objectives: A Feasibility Study," was produced for the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations. It concluded that potential targets for the U.S. included Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Venezuela, Libya, and Nigeria. "Analysis indicates . . . [that military forces of OPEC countries are] quantitatively and qualitatively inferior [and] could be swiftly crushed.

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Tim Elfrink is a former investigative reporter and managing editor for Miami New Times. He has won the George Polk Award and was a finalist for the Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting.
Contact: Tim Elfrink