Media

Gerald Posner Plagiarized in Why America Slept and Secrets of the Kingdom, Research Shows

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AP May 14, 2004:

Federal regulators fined Riggs Bank a record $25 million on Thursday for allegedly violating anti-money laundering laws in its handling of tens of millions in cash transactions in Saudi-controlled accounts under investigation for possible links to terrorism financing.

"Secrets of the Kingdom," pg 177:

... federal regulators fined Riggs a record $25 million for a "willful, systemic" violation of anti-money-laundering law, specifically its handling of tens of millions in cash transactions in Saudi-controlled accounts under investigation for possible links to terrorism financing.

St. Petersberg Times September 27, 2001:

In April 2000, Alhamzi shows up at the National Air College Flight School in San Diego. He wants to fly a plane. But the school questions his limited knowledge of English and he gets only one lesson. May 2000: Alhamzi is joined in San Diego by al-Midhar. They ask about learning to fly Boeing jets at Sorbi's Flying Club in San Diego. They're told they must master Cessnas and Pipers first. "You can't just jump right into Boeings," the instructor says. "You have to start slower." When the instructor takes them up, al-Midhar has trouble with the basics. At times, he becomes afraid and prays to Allah."

"Why America Slept" pg 147:

In April 2000, Nawaf Alhazmi turned up at the National Air College Flight School in San Diego. He wanted to fly a plane. But a school instructor questioned his limited English and he got only one lesson.
In May, Alhazmi was joined in San Diego by Khalid al-Midhar. When they asked about learning to fly Boeing jets at Sorbi's Flying Club in San Diego, they were dejected when told they must first master Cessnas and Pipers. "You can't just jump right into Boeings," the instructor said. "You have to start slower." When the instructor took them aloft, al-Midhar had trouble with rudimentary procedures. At times, he was so nervous that he prayed to Allah.

From the same story:

Dec. 21, 2000: Atta and al-Shehhi are issued pilot licenses Dec. 29, 2000: Atta and al-Shehhi cross the state to Opa-Locka, just north of Miami, for a dry run on a simulator for big jets. At SimCenter Inc., each spends three hours on a full-motion 727 simulator. They concentrate on turns. Each pays $1,500, cash.

Why America Slept, pg 147

On December 21, 2000, Atta and al-Shehhi were issued pilot licenses....Atta and al-Shehhi meanwhile crossed the state to Opa-Locka, north of Miami, where they had reserved time on a big jet simulator at SimCenter Inc. Each spent three hours on a full-motion 727 simulator. They concentrated on turns, not landing or taking off. Each paid $1,500 cash.

New York Times, April 21, 1995:

He checked into O'Hare International Airport in Chicago on Wednesday night for a flight to Rome, with connections for a flight to Amman, Jordan. In addition to fitting the suspect profile, he was dressed in a jogging suit similar to one that a witness in Oklahoma City had reported seeing worn by a man at the scene of the explosion.

"Why America Slept," pg 84:

Ahmed had checked in at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport on Wednesday night, less than 12 hours after the blast, for a flight to Rome with connections to Jordan. In addition to fitting the suspect profile, he was dressed in a jogging suit similar to one that a witness in Oklahoma City had reported seeing worn by a man near the scene of the explosion.

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Tim Elfrink is a former investigative reporter and managing editor for Miami New Times. He has won the George Polk Award and was a finalist for the Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting.
Contact: Tim Elfrink