BEST DOUGHNUTS Krispy Kreme 6290 S. Dixie Highway

South Miami

305-669-1311

www.krispykreme.com Krispy Kreme has won this title a few times over the years, but when you are stoned at 3:00 a.m., is that mom-and-pop joint going to bake you fresh and HOT doughnuts to satisfy your munchies? The South Miami shop is the newest one to open in the Miami-Dade area (check www.krispykreme.com for additional locations), and it has 24-hour drive-through service, great coffee, a viewing area for you to gaze at the glazing process, and a clean, well-lighted place to savor Homer Simpson's favorite snack. Yeah, Krispy Kreme is being investigated by the SEC and the U.S. Attorney's Office for matters regarding its franchises, and the company's being sued by stock-owning employees who claim they didn't know that stocks are a risky investment, but we're just talking doughnuts here. Tasty, hot doughnuts. And Krispy Kreme is still doing that right.

BEST UPSCALE MOM-AND-POP RESTAURANT

Talula

Talula
BEST UPSCALE MOM-AND-POP RESTAURANT Talula 210 23rd Street

Miami Beach

305-672-0778

www.talulaonline.com Okay, we admit it: The mom-and-pop thing is just a cute way of recognizing Talula -- because how could we not acknowledge one of our very best restaurants? The matrimonial proprietor/chef team of Andrea Curto-Randazzo and Frank Randazzo (formerly and respectively of Wish and Gaucho Room) have received plenty of press mileage on their parenting both child and highly successful South Beach dining establishment, but once customers take a seat in Talula (or the lushly landscaped garden patio in back), the smartly innovative, contemporary American cuisine is all they'll care about. Grilled Sonoma Valley foie gras with blue corn cakes, caramelized pears, candied walnuts, and a drizzle of chili syrup exemplifies the solid concepts and exquisitely delicious cooking that comes from the kitchen. So does the cascabel chili-crusted barbecued quail with heavenly puffs of sweet-potato agnolotti pasta. Ditto the lavender-crusted lamb loin with truffled goat-cheese potato croquette and cold smoked grape vinaigrette. The whole menu sings with brash, fresh flavors; the wine list hums along; and Talula is an unqualified hit. Mommy and Daddy, take your bows. Then, if you can, take a nap.

BEST UPSCALE MOM-AND-POP RESTAURANT

Talula

BEST UPSCALE MOM-AND-POP RESTAURANT Talula 210 23rd Street

Miami Beach

305-672-0778

www.talulaonline.com Okay, we admit it: The mom-and-pop thing is just a cute way of recognizing Talula -- because how could we not acknowledge one of our very best restaurants? The matrimonial proprietor/chef team of Andrea Curto-Randazzo and Frank Randazzo (formerly and respectively of Wish and Gaucho Room) have received plenty of press mileage on their parenting both child and highly successful South Beach dining establishment, but once customers take a seat in Talula (or the lushly landscaped garden patio in back), the smartly innovative, contemporary American cuisine is all they'll care about. Grilled Sonoma Valley foie gras with blue corn cakes, caramelized pears, candied walnuts, and a drizzle of chili syrup exemplifies the solid concepts and exquisitely delicious cooking that comes from the kitchen. So does the cascabel chili-crusted barbecued quail with heavenly puffs of sweet-potato agnolotti pasta. Ditto the lavender-crusted lamb loin with truffled goat-cheese potato croquette and cold smoked grape vinaigrette. The whole menu sings with brash, fresh flavors; the wine list hums along; and Talula is an unqualified hit. Mommy and Daddy, take your bows. Then, if you can, take a nap.

BEST CAFé CUBANO Puerto Sagua 700 Collins Avenue

Miami Beach

305-673-1115 It's nearly impossible to get a bad café Cubano anywhere around here. The sugary jolt in a cup and its cousin the cortadito are essential to human life, thus generally prepared with care. The only thing that can make a café Cubano better is more café Cubano, so Puerto Sagua is the place to go, because once the folks at the counter get to know you, they'll give you refills. A Miami Beach landmark, Puerto Sagua opened in 1962. There's a counter by the front door and a dining room with a colorful 3-D painting of Old Havana by the famous Skull Sisters decorating the back wall, so it looks about the same as it did more than 40 years ago. Spanish is spoken first here, and attempts by learners are rewarded with authentic food as well as the titular café Cubano.

Readers´ Choice: Versailles

Puerto Sagua
Leah Gabriel
BEST CAFé CUBANO Puerto Sagua 700 Collins Avenue

Miami Beach

305-673-1115 It's nearly impossible to get a bad café Cubano anywhere around here. The sugary jolt in a cup and its cousin the cortadito are essential to human life, thus generally prepared with care. The only thing that can make a café Cubano better is more café Cubano, so Puerto Sagua is the place to go, because once the folks at the counter get to know you, they'll give you refills. A Miami Beach landmark, Puerto Sagua opened in 1962. There's a counter by the front door and a dining room with a colorful 3-D painting of Old Havana by the famous Skull Sisters decorating the back wall, so it looks about the same as it did more than 40 years ago. Spanish is spoken first here, and attempts by learners are rewarded with authentic food as well as the titular café Cubano.

Readers´ Choice: Versailles

BEST COFFEEHOUSE Segafredo Espresso 1040 Lincoln Road

Miami Beach

305-673-0047

www.segafredo.it Segafredo's charm lies in it being a European-style café, which is similar to what the pre-Starbucks American coffee shop used to be: It's not about the bean; it's about the scene. Partners Graziano Sbroggio (Tiramesu, Spris) and Mark Soyka (News Café, Van Dyke, Soyka) know plenty about scene. Nearly all the seating is outdoors on the west end of Lincoln Road, by the gorgeous mosaic fountain created by artist Carlos Alves. Grab a seat or sink into a comfy couch, order an eponymous espresso and a precious little pastry (or go the martini/panini route, which is something you can't do at most coffeehouses), and you'll swear you're in some classy overseas city -- with tropical weather to boot. Weekday afternoons and evenings are the best times to chill. Wear a beret, perhaps a silk scarf, utter phrases such as "ne plus ultra" or "Take it from me, catwalks aren't all they're cracked up to be," and you'll fit right in. Or come as you are and be entertained by listening to other people say things like that.

Readers´ Choice: Starbucks

BEST COFFEEHOUSE Segafredo Espresso 1040 Lincoln Road

Miami Beach

305-673-0047

www.segafredo.it Segafredo's charm lies in it being a European-style café, which is similar to what the pre-Starbucks American coffee shop used to be: It's not about the bean; it's about the scene. Partners Graziano Sbroggio (Tiramesu, Spris) and Mark Soyka (News Café, Van Dyke, Soyka) know plenty about scene. Nearly all the seating is outdoors on the west end of Lincoln Road, by the gorgeous mosaic fountain created by artist Carlos Alves. Grab a seat or sink into a comfy couch, order an eponymous espresso and a precious little pastry (or go the martini/panini route, which is something you can't do at most coffeehouses), and you'll swear you're in some classy overseas city -- with tropical weather to boot. Weekday afternoons and evenings are the best times to chill. Wear a beret, perhaps a silk scarf, utter phrases such as "ne plus ultra" or "Take it from me, catwalks aren't all they're cracked up to be," and you'll fit right in. Or come as you are and be entertained by listening to other people say things like that.

Readers´ Choice: Starbucks

BEST JAPANESE RESTAURANT Yakko-San 17040 W. Dixie Highway

North Miami Beach

305-947-0064 It's generally considered a prime sign of authentic excellence when an ethnic restaurant's clientele includes many people from the nation in question. That's true of Yakko-San, but even more impressive is what you'll find late at night: a lot of chefs. With no fanfare and no public-relations machine, this off-the-glam-track spot has become the late-night hangout where chefs from other Asian restaurants go to dine after their own places close. The draw is fare not to be found at the average Japanese restaurant -- virtually no sushi or yakitori this-and-that, but Japanese home cooking. Portions are sized like tapas, so diners can try a large variety of dishes. Some are admittedly strange (like "spicy konnyaku potato alimentary") but most, despite their unfamiliarity, are very accessible: kinpira gobu (burdock root bathed in intensely rich reduced sweet/salty soy sauce), maguro nuta (raw tuna strips and scallions painted with addictive honey-miso mustard sauce), or savory sautéed beef with garlic stems. The feast is on till 3:30 a.m. daily.

Readers´ Choice: Nobu

BEST JAPANESE RESTAURANT Yakko-San 17040 W. Dixie Highway

North Miami Beach

305-947-0064 It's generally considered a prime sign of authentic excellence when an ethnic restaurant's clientele includes many people from the nation in question. That's true of Yakko-San, but even more impressive is what you'll find late at night: a lot of chefs. With no fanfare and no public-relations machine, this off-the-glam-track spot has become the late-night hangout where chefs from other Asian restaurants go to dine after their own places close. The draw is fare not to be found at the average Japanese restaurant -- virtually no sushi or yakitori this-and-that, but Japanese home cooking. Portions are sized like tapas, so diners can try a large variety of dishes. Some are admittedly strange (like "spicy konnyaku potato alimentary") but most, despite their unfamiliarity, are very accessible: kinpira gobu (burdock root bathed in intensely rich reduced sweet/salty soy sauce), maguro nuta (raw tuna strips and scallions painted with addictive honey-miso mustard sauce), or savory sautéed beef with garlic stems. The feast is on till 3:30 a.m. daily.

Readers´ Choice: Nobu

Taco Shop Mexican Grill
BEST TACO Roberto's Taco Shop Various locations in Miami-Dade County

www.robertos.us The year 1962 was very bad for tacos. That's when Glen Bell opened the first Taco Bell in Downey, California. A good year for tacos was 1964. That's when Roberto and Dolores Robledo and family introduced their original Mexican Taco Shop in San Diego. Their mission statement then was the same it is now for the far-flung Roberto's Taco Shop chain: "Fresh, authentic, quality ingredients; simple food at modest prices; and satisfying portions." Roberto's tacos encapsulate these qualities within their hard little U-shaped shells and soft tortilla wraps. The grilled chicken and beef tacos will satisfy any hunger, but grilled and marinated fish, juicy carne asada, and plump pork carnitas, in our preferred soft tortillas, will have you shaking your head at just how delicious a fast-food taco can be. Prices are more than modest: $1.95 to $2.25 for a generously sized shell, or three smaller tacos for $1.99 (a dollar more with guacamole or sour cream). A wide array of hot sauces too. Ay, Chihuahua!

Best Of Miami®

Best Of Miami®