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| Culture |

WSVN Anchor Reed Cowan's Documentary on Mormons and Prop 8 Will Get National Distribution

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You may know Reed Cowan from WSVN's weekend night news desk, but the openly gay anchor has been moonlighting as a filmmaker. After debuting at the Sundance Film Festival last month his latest documentary, 8: The Mormon Proposition, has been picked up for theatrical and DVD release.

Narrated by Oscar-winning screenwriter Dustin Lance Black, who like Cowan grew up in the Mormon church, the film takes a look at the church's successful involvement in passing Proposition 8 in California, which banned gay marriage.

Cowan's project first picked up steam when he leaked an interview with Utah State Senator Chris Buttars, a member of the Mormon church.

"I believe they will destroy the foundation of the American society," said Buttars, adding that gays and lesbians are "the greatest threat to America going down."

From their the project gathered the attention of a financial backer and Lance Black.

The film's trailer has been taken off YouTube for some reason, but is still available on the official website. It claims that 75 percent of all money donated to Proposition 8 backers came from Mormon families, and inter-cuts quotes of a man saying "It's better to be dead than to be gay," with protest signs reading "Stop the Christian fascists."

The Mormon church claims the film is inaccurate.

"I would hold a screening at church headquarters for them," Cowan told the Associated Press. "I would love to know line by line what's inaccurate."

Cowan is no stranger to documentary film making, having previously chronicled his personal story of being called to cover the story of a 4-year-old boy who had accidentally fatally hung himself on a swing set only to discover that it was his own set in his previous film The Other Side of the Lens.

Red Flag Releasing bought the distribution rights, and the film could be in theaters nationwide by as early as this spring.

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