Culture

New York's Hot New Fitness Craze: Fake Miami Clubbing

Who goes clubbing at 11:45 a.m. on a Saturday morning? New Yorkers.

That's according to Business Insider, which yesterday profiled 305 Fitness, an aerobics dance class founded by Miami native Sadie Kurzban and inspired, apparently, by the shit that goes down at Mansion around 3 a.m.

The classes, in which dancers strike poses and jump up and down as neon lights flash around them and Shakira tunes blast over the speakers, are meant to imitate the Miami nightclub experience. And according to the Insider, their popularity has "exploded" in New York.

See also: LazerFitness: Skip the Gym and Get Your Sweat On at the Club

Kurzban left her South Florida hometown to attend Brown University in the decidedly un-Miami city of Providence, Rhode Island. There, she was inspired to start her own fitness company, changed her major to economics, and entered an entrepreneurship competition to win the start-up funds for 305 Fitness. From there, it was on to New York.

Unsurprisingly, people who call New York home because it's "the greatest city in the world" -- the same ones who spend all their vacation days in Miami -- started lining up for a taste of the 305.

Like Miami clubs, most attendees are young; "I don't get a lot of mommies," Kurzban tells the Insider.

And much like the Miami club experience, it's not for the faint of heart. "It's a lot of jumping, turning, and squatting, so if you have sore joints or bad knees, this is probably not the fitness class for you," the story warns.

But judging from the video above, the Miami club experience is far from authentic. Everybody looks sober, for one. Everybody looks happy, too. And so many women! Even when ladies get in free, it's just not a Miami club without Miami bros.

But the part where everyone mindlessly jumps around with their hands in the air? That looks about right.

Follow Ciara LaVelle on Twitter @ciaralavelle.

Follow Cultist on Facebook and Twitter @CultistMiami.

KEEP MIAMI NEW TIMES FREE... Since we started Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we'd like to keep it that way. With local media under siege, it's more important than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" program, allowing us to keep offering readers access to our incisive coverage of local news, food and culture with no paywalls.
Ciara LaVelle is New Times' former arts and culture editor. She earned her BS in journalism at Boston University and moved to Florida in 2004. She joined New Times' staff in 2011.
Contact: Ciara LaVelle