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Miami Fast Food Workers: New Website Asks "Are You Robbed on the Job?"

Protesters converge on a Miami McDonald's to demand better wages.
Protesters converge on a Miami McDonald's to demand better wages.
Low Pay is not OK

Fast food workers across America as getting tired of the vast difference between the salaries of the corporate bigwigs and their meager earnings. The difference, by the way, is astounding.

According to a Nerdwallet report, if broken down into an hourly wage, the CEO of McDonald's would earn $9,247 every 60 seconds. Compare that to the average hourly wage of an employee in his ranks, which is $7.73.

See also: Miami Fast-Food Workers to Protest at Miami McDonald's for Fair Wages

To add insult, many giant fast food corporations are now being accused of cheating workers out of hours and pay. Examples of "wage theft" include having workers not report overtime hours or asking them to work without clocking in.

Recently, McDonald's employees in several states have filed class action lawsuits against the restaurant giant, claiming that "illegally underpaid employees by erasing hours from their time cards, not paying overtime, and ordering them to work off the clock," according to the New York Times.

This past Tuesday, fast food workers and supporters took to the streets in multiple cities to protest low hourly pay and demand a fair living wage. In Miami, a group of protesters converged upon a Midtown Miami McDonald's to make the public aware of their plight.

Oscar Rivera, a local Wendy's employee who makes $7.95 an hour, was at the protest. Rivera says that paying rent and utilities, along with sending money to his family in Nicaragua, is a challenge with his paycheck.

The organization Low Pay is Not OK has started a new website, robbedonthejob.org. It's looking for workers who feel they've been victim to "wage theft" and is seeking the support of the community by starting an online petition, asking McDonald's to increase the hourly wage for restaurant employees.

In the meantime, check out what happened at the Miami protest:

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