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Poll: 74 Percent of Floridians Support Medical Marijuana

Poll numbers about how many Floridians support legalizing medical marijuana seem to be all over the place -- well, except below the 60 percent necessary it would need to pass. A new University of North Florida poll shows that 74 percent of Floridians intend to vote to legalize medicinal pot in November. That's down from 82 percent in a poll from November, but again, unless there's some dramatic shift, all signs continue to point to this thing passing.

See also: How to Grow Pot for (Soon to Be) Legal Profit: Inside Cannabis Career Institute's Miami Seminar

"This amendment allows the medical use of marijuana for individuals with debilitating diseases as determined by a licensed Florida physician. If the election were held today, would you vote Yes or No for this proposition?" the poll asked.

Seventy-four percent said yes. Twenty-two percent said no. Only 4 percent aren't sure yet.

Five hundred seven registered voters were contacted for the poll.

That's down from the 82 percent who showed support in a November Quinnipiac poll, but up from the 70 percent who supported the idea in a poll conducted this past February.

However, Floridians aren't quite ready to sign off on complete decriminalization.

Only 41 percent "strongly" or "somewhat" supported "allowing adults in Florida to legally possess small amounts of marijuana for recreational use." Fifty-seven percent said they would not support the idea, with a whopping 46 percent saying they would strongly oppose the idea.

The poll also asked an interesting question about Stand Your Ground without actually mentioning the law by name:

"Current Florida law states that a person 'has no duty to retreat and has the right to stand his or her ground and meet force with force to prevent death or great bodily harm to themselves or someone else. Do you support or oppose requiring people to take reasonable steps to retreat before using force to defend themselves?"

Sixty-two percent supported the idea of requiring people to take "reasonable steps to retreat" before defending themselves, with 41 percent "strongly" supporting. Only 29 percent opposed, with 22 percent "strongly" opposing.

Other polls show broader support for Stand Your Ground, but most mention the law by name and not by describing what it actually entails.

The poll also asked about the gubernatorial race. The response was closer than other polls, with 34/33 split slightly in favor of Charlie Crist. It, however, included an option for "someone else," which 17 percent chose. Polls that pit Crist against Rick Scott with no third option generally show Crist with a greater lead.

Send your story tips to the author, Kyle Munzenrieder.

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