Historic Preservationist Seek to Save Miami Herald Building

Historic Preservationist Seek to Save Miami Herald Building

Despite the fact it's basically a big ugly box painted in a shade that resembles faded mustard, historic preservationists are trying to save the Miami Herald building by seeking historic status. That would, of course, impede Malaysian gambling magnate Genting Corp, which now owns the building and the land it sits on, from implementing its now tempered plans to turn the site into condo buildings and a hotel. 

The Herald of course, to their credit, is still breaking most Herald-building-related news, and says that an application was submitted to the Dade Heritage Trust this week to grant the building historic status. That would prevent any significant alterations to the outside of the building. Genting of course wants to just tear the whole thing down, which would, obviously, also be prevented. 

The historic designation would allow additions to the current building. So, theoretically, it could become a big ugly midcentury box surrounded by modern additions. Great! 

From the Herald:

"You can't take decades of Miami history and wipe it clean in the blink of an eye," said Becky Roper Matkov, chief executive officer of the Dade Heritage Trust. "We undersand that they have to do something useful with the building, but we just think it has a lot of potential if you're creative in how you reuse it."

In making the case for historic preservation, the application points to the building's distinction as a prime example of Miami Modern architecture (dubbed MiMo), the role its leaders played in Miami's history and how the paper itself has reflected the changing trends in the community.

Miami, we think, deserves a paper that still accurately reflects the changing trends of the community, and not necessarily a building that used to house one.

People at the Dade Heritage Trust apparently consider it a prime example of MiMo architecture, which we think is a slap in the face of MiMo architecture. It's an office building that reflects the architecture trends of the time it was built, but most certainly not is a prime example of them. 
Discussions will be taken up by the board in September. 

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