Reality Show Scams, Zach Galifianakis, Art by Octogenarians, and Why Cheaters Get Impotent

Have an election night hangover? Worried about the state of world now that Republicans have control of the House again? Forget your troubles by diving into the arts in this week's print edition of Miami New Times.

We'll start things off with a little reminder that things can be worse. Staff Writer Gus Garcia Robert's "Art Caper," details how South Florida artists, investors and a film crew got screwed by film producer Gino Cabanas. What Cabanas claimed was Fox's next reality show, Work of Genius, which put the spotlight on budding artists, turned into a major time and money suck for all involved. And it looks like the show will never see the light of day.

Mesches "Anomie 1947."
Mesches "Anomie 1947."

Next up, Carlos Suarez De Jesus provides an in depth look into the world of

octogenarian painter Arnold Mesches in "Desolation Row." Mesches, 87,

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has been around from Ike to Obama, and his art has evolved all along the

way.

The artist -- who was investigated by the FBI during the Hoover years and

later obtained the agency's files to use in his work -- has been an

activist all of his life. But Mesches says he shies away from stepping

into the quagmire of propaganda, instead mentioning the political

realities of the times in hopes viewers will raise their own questions

when they encounter his art. "These paintings are all about ideas and

how I have experienced the world and my life," he says. "I want to be

provocative rather than overt, instead of hitting people on the head."

Zach steals the show, just like in the Hangover.
Zach steals the show, just like in the Hangover.
Warner Bros. Pictures

If Mesches' work is a bit too serious for you then read Karina

Longworth's "Zach Attack" which tells you why you should go watch Due

Date, the new flick starring Zach Galifianakis and Robert Downey Jr.

Even if it can be called the Hangover 2, without the good looking guy

and the guy from The Office, Longworth says filmmakers found something

that works and are juicing it for all it's worth.

In interviews to promote Due Date, director Todd Phillips has claimed

the film was intended as a battery-recharging quickie in between the

king-making success of The Hangover and the high-pressure assignment of

creating a franchise-cementing sequel. The best thing that can be said

about Due Date is that it lives up to Phillips's advance billing: From a

breakneck pace that makes its 95-minute running time fly by, to the

high-contrast patina of its high-speed Super 35 source stock, to a

stoner-esque disinterest in Chekhovian payoff that's such a balls-out

fuck-you to conventional screenwriting that it's sort of exciting, Due

Date is fast, lazy, and out of control in a manner that's basically

commendable.

Dan says a guilty peepy doesn't always work.
Dan says a guilty peepy doesn't always work.

Finally, if you're thinking about getting over election night blues with

a little adulterous sex, Dan Savage will set you straight. Check out

"Savage Love" as

Dan explains to a father why he was struck with a sudden case of

impotence when he tried cheating on his wife.

You're going to have to--sorry!--talk to the wife about your frustrations

and the possibility of opening up your marriage. Because the only way

your dick is going to work with other women, NCSO, is if you're not

risking everything with it.


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