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  • Jefferson in Virginia - Twilight at Monticello:  An Evening with Thomas Jefferson

    Article

    Jefferson in Virginia - Twilight at Monticello: An Evening with Thomas Jefferson

    The fascinating part of Twilight at Monticello: An Evening with Thomas Jefferson is not the hour-and-45-minute monologue that serves as the main attraction but rather the short question-and-answer period that follows in which actor-creator J.D. Sutto...

    by Robin Dougherty on July 22, 1999
  • Article

    A Plague on Your Upper Houses

    What's a nice socialist playwright like Naomi Wallace doing in Coral Gables? Getting a crackerjack production of her play at the New Theatre, that's what. Wallace's 1996-97 Obie-winning play One Flea Spare, is about class struggle, bubonic plague, an...

    by Robin Dougherty on July 15, 1999
  • Article

    Pair of Witless Queens

    It's almost always funnier when men dress up as women than the other way around. Judy Garland and Liza Minnelli are drag standbys in theaters and cabarets around the world. Elizabeth Dole and Hillary Clinton are routinely skewered on Saturday Night L...

    by Robin Dougherty on July 8, 1999
  • Article

    This Analysis Is a Quackup

    Playwright John Patrick Shanley once told the New York Times that he bought a copy of Krafft-Ebing's nineteenth-century textbook Psychopathia Sexualis because "I have an unhealthy interest in sex and eccentric German people." (Well, who doesn't?) It ...

    by Robin Dougherty on July 1, 1999
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    Sex for Seniors

    Mixed Emotions! is the name of Richard Baer's astoundingly popular comedy about two golden agers who fall in love. Since its February opening, the show has been a hit for the Broward Stage Door Theatre, which has extended it through late July. Mixed ...

    by Robin Dougherty on June 24, 1999
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    Best Be Getting Home

    Like the old adage about good campers who can start a fire with only three matchsticks, the M Ensemble Company, Inc., has struck a full blaze with Home, a production crackling with inventiveness that defies its low-budget parameters with combustible ...

    by Robin Dougherty on June 17, 1999
  • Article

    Much Ado About Sonnets

    Info: Much Ado About Sonnets By Robin Dougherty The two-year-old Actors' Project Theatre Company is the first to admit that with Love's Fire, it's shamelessly cashing in on the current cachet of William Shakespeare. "He's hip and young, but older ...

    by Robin Dougherty on June 10, 1999
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    Musically In-Clined

    If memory serves, Archie Bunker never ranted about brilliant country and western stars who experienced rapid career trajectories and died tragic deaths, possibly because none ever crossed his path. So it's difficult to imagine what he'd think of daug...

    by Robin Dougherty on June 3, 1999
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    Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary

    Suicide, abortion, death by torture, and plagiarism of an obscure British novelist are an awful lot to cram into a single play. In fact just one of these topics would be a challenge for the best of playwrights. Shakespeare's potboiler, Titus Androni...

    by Robin Dougherty on May 27, 1999
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    Impressions a la Mode

    In the GableStage production of Full Gallop, actress Judith Delgado reaches out and grabs the audience by their lapels. It's a performance that would simply thrill Diana Vreeland, whose obsession with clothing infuses this one-woman show just as her ...

    by Robin Dougherty on May 20, 1999
  • Article

    High Jinks at Sea

    Early in Tom Stoppard's comedy Rough Crossing, a character refers to the Irish policeman named Murphy who makes an entrance at the beginning of The Merchant of Venice. Don't remember Murphy? You're not alone. Never heard of Rough Crossing? You're als...

    by Robin Dougherty on May 13, 1999
  • Article

    A Fairy Good Tale

    When I asked the four-year-old next to me to explain the appeal of Snow White, she replied, "Seven beds. Seven bowls. Seven everything." This little theatergoer has probably never heard of Bruno Bettelheim, who deconstructed the fairy tales of the Br...

    by Robin Dougherty on May 6, 1999
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    God Help the Queen

    If Sid Caesar had ever performed a sketch about Henry VIII, it might have resembled the hilarious second act of The King's Mare, Oscar E. Moore's bio-comedy about the Tudor monarch and his fourth wife, Anne of Cleves. The entire play is now enjoying ...

    by Robin Dougherty on April 29, 1999
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    Death Be Not Subtle

    Ariel Dorfman's political potboiler opens like the creaky thrillers from which it's descended -- on the proverbial dark and stormy night. Paulina is alone, waiting for her husband to arrive at their desolate beach house. It's raining. There's no phon...

    by Robin Dougherty on April 22, 1999
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    A Moon Not Forgotten

    "It sure was a beautiful night," says Jamie Tyrone, one of the two survivors in American theater's most famous morning-after scene. "I'll never forget it," this drunk says to Josie Hogan, the woman who has given him the only respite from misery he's ...

    by Robin Dougherty on April 15, 1999
  • Article

    Horse Whipped

    William Mastrosimone's Tamer of Horses takes place in a universe in which a kid named Hector wanders into the lives of two frustrated classics professors. You might surmise a coincidence like this is at hand from the title, a reference to Hector, the...

    by Robin Dougherty on April 8, 1999
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    Misuse of Ivory Power

    David Mamet's war-between-the-sexes conundrum is nothing if not a tense night out at the theater. That's true if you're male, female, a college student, a professor, or merely an innocent bystander trying to figure out whether there actually is a wat...

    by Robin Dougherty on April 1, 1999
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    Blinded by the Light

    The "dinner party for dead people" play, in which an author gathers people who may or may not have met in real life and plops them into the same room for supper, isn't officially recognized as a dramatic genre. But it's so popular that maybe it ought...

    by Robin Dougherty on March 25, 1999
  • Article

    Gin and Tonic

    Imagine a brainy spider battling cartoon character Foghorn Leghorn and you'll get some idea of the shenanigans onstage in the National Actors Theatre touring production of The Gin Game, starring Julie Harris and Charles Durning. The Tony Randall-prod...

    by Robin Dougherty on March 18, 1999
  • Article

    Reckless Driving

    Li'l Bit, the haunted protagonist of How I Learned to Drive, compares her Uncle Peck to the Flying Dutchman, the legendary figure condemned to travel the Earth until a maiden loves him of her own free will. The play, which won author Paula Vogel the ...

    by Robin Dougherty on March 11, 1999
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