Reader Mail: Alberto Carvalho "Is the Ultimate Political Illusionist"

Super Struggles

"Even more unfortunate and depressing is when some of these good community leaders come up for air, when they surface to realize they may have been duped... and they call out Carvalho to fix it, he responds the same way every time."

The super's the problem: Alberto Carvalho is a special case ("Carvalho Criticized," Chuck Strouse, March 6). He sits imperially impervious, camouflaged in a fancy suit, with neatly groomed hair, articulate, paranoid, well-scripted, self-absorbed, intelligent, cunning, calculated, and always looking ahead. He is the ultimate political illusionist with a top hat full of tricks, treats, and façades. Sadly, many of those seated in the front row of this magic show are from the urban core. Even more unfortunate and depressing is, when some of these good community leaders come up for air, when they surface to realize they may have been duped... and they call out Carvalho to fix it, he responds the same way every time. Carvalho may be a little man, but he must always have the biggest chair in the room. All roads must lead to him. A fancy vocabulary with big ambitions, big dreams, and motivation all tied to the only thing that matters — himself. His career. His name. His resumé. His photos. His brand. His image.

The Miami-Dade school system has never been so politicized. It has never been so superintendent-centric. It has never been so image-conscious; not to say that is a bad thing, but it is to the point of obsession. The weekly media stories are ad nauseam. How many awards can one place into his trophy case? It becomes a distraction to the children and the teachers. Enough already. He appears in the media more than any elected local official or local professional athlete, for that matter, yet he enjoys the comfort and protection of prancing around as an appointed administrator.

Children can be an easy prop or pawn to use and rally behind because they are as American as Chevrolet and apple pie. When one wears a mask for so long, he actually begins to believe he is who the mask is. cargon786

No, it's the kids: You know, this article really bothers me. Because on one side there is Carvalho, about whom many people have their own views. On the other, there is the African-American community... Neither side is perfect. But I will tell you, when it comes to technology, Central, Northwestern, Jackson, and Booker T. Washington High get the things they want. Central Senior has one of the newest buildings in the school system. It has gotten everything it wants. The fact is that when you give kids who don't care new buildings, they destroy them. We either have problems with theft or the kids vandalize what they are given. When the kids are given the best equipment, they do nothing with it. They break it, then complain and want more. They always want more, but they squander what they get. Northwestern is close to the same. The students get things and break them. This is just like buying millions in tablets for kids who cannot handle the responsibility of taking care of them. That's why technicians have always pushed for desktops — because they last longer and take a beating better then laptops. nightstalker4848

Spiked and Sparked

Bury your beefs, Luke: Regarding Luther Campbell's March 6 column, "Spike That Comment," if black people would trade their beefs for benevolence, we would be one of the top emerging economic cultures in America. As black people, we're all guilty of charitable gentrification due to not using Black History Month to come together. The inception of Black History Month was supposed to spark a civil rights movement among our people that would have eradicated the astronomical poverty we face today. The good news is "it's not too late" to inspire a beef that feeds our culture rather than a beef that continues to starve us all. Luke, you can be the beginning of a new movement by reaching out to Spike Lee and offering to bury all your beefs and turn them into the economic meal our people so desperately need. dadainc1

Wrestler and Rassler

Trouble with girls? I remember Alvin ("Redemption in the Ring," Scott Fishman, March 6). We were cool. He got into some major trouble with a girl who went to high school with us my senior year, and that was the last I heard from him until my son (who's an avid wrestling fan) became familiar with him and his background and asked me if I knew him (because my son thinks I know everybody from Miami). I was shocked to find out it was Alvin. His story is definitely inspiring. Delouie Avant

More pain: Alvin worked for WWE for a while, which is as big as it gets. Now he's working for another wrestling promotion known as TNA. He even had an undiagnosed heart condition and found out about it while undergoing routine testing for a wrestling match. How sad that the article doesn't point that out, because the quote "wrestling saved my life" is even more true! Alain D. Mozas

 
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