Herzog's play is good but imperfect. There are points where too much is explained, such as when Leo describes the accident and adds that a public relations lady demanded his camera. And the ending is abrupt. But overall, the pacing is perfect — a credit to Joseph Adler's always-brilliant direction. Herzog is a writer in her mid-30s whose talent is growing fast and who is clearly testing herself and her art form. I look forward to seeing more from her on local stages.

Grandma Vera is on the horn.
George Schiavone
Grandma Vera is on the horn.

Location Info

Map

GableStage at the Biltmore

1200 Anastasia Ave.
Coral Gables, FL 33134

Category: Performing Arts Venues

Region: Coral Gables/South Miami

Details

4000 Miles: Through April 14 at GableStage at the Biltmore, 1200 Anastasia Ave., Coral Gables; 305-445-1119; gablestage.org. Tickets cost $37.50 to $50.

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With its recent production of Hamlet and the planned staging of a Haitian-inspired Antony and Cleopatra, GableStage has entered a new period. It is working with some of the world's best theaters on these innovative dramas. While Herzog's play is a solid beginning, the theater must try harder and be more ambitious in its choices if it is to lead Miami to the top rung of American theater markets. Adler is to be congratulated for this formidable performance. Now he needs to aim even higher.

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3 comments
soflath8rscene
soflath8rscene

While we're always dubious when a non-professional decides to step in as a theater critic, we have to say this isn't a terrible effort.

There is still too much of the story revealed - a freshman mistake that is all too common in reviews.  Ideally, the plot should be a maximum of one paragraph.  It's called "spoilers," and and editor should be flogged everytime too much of the story is included in a review.  But hey, you ARE the editor, so who's left to chop off your bloat?


There is also a failure to separate out what makes certain elements of the play work; this isn't a movie.  In a movie, the character and the actor playing it can be used interchangeably, because we're all going to see the same movie.  The scenes will always flow the same, the timing will be the same, and so on.  This isn't true of plays.  Sure, this PRODUCTION will always have Oser as Vera, but a year or two down the line, someone else is going to produce this play, and when readers find THIS review while looking for THAT one (or simply researching the play), it should be clear what parts of the play's success (or failure) are due to the playwright, and which parts are due to the actors' interpretation, and how much of that is colored by the director's overall vision.

But you write real pretty, and you managed to turn it into a proper review at the end there.  The only other thing you missed is that Equity is the diminutive form of the name of a union: Actors' Equity Association (AEA).  It should always be capitalized as such.  B-

soflath8rscene
soflath8rscene

While we're always dubious when a non-professional decides to step in as a theater critic, we have to say this isn't a terrible effort.

There is still too much of the story revealed - a freshman mistake that is all too common in reviews.  Ideally, the plot should be a maximum of one paragraph.  It's called "spoilers," and and editor should be flogged everytime too much of the story is included in a review.  But hey, you ARE the editor, so who's left to chop off your bloat?


There is also a failure to separate out what makes certain elements of the play work; this isn't a movie.  In a movie, the character and the actor playing it can be used interchangeably, because we're all going to see the same movie.  The scenes will always flow the same, the timing will be the same, and so on.  This isn't true of plays.  Sure, this PRODUCTION will always have Oser as Vera, but a year or two down the line, someone else is going to produce this play, and when readers find THIS review while looking for THAT one (or simply researching the play), it should be clear what parts of the play's success (or failure) are due to the playwright, and which parts are due to the actors' interpretation, and how much of that is colored by the director's overall vision.

But you write real pretty, and you managed to turn it into a proper review at the end there.  The only other thing you missed is that Equity is the diminutive form of the name of a union: Actors' Equity Association (AEA).  It should always be capitalized as such.  B-

carbonellawards
carbonellawards

Carbonell Award Recommended:

4000 Miles
at GableStage
Now through April 14, 2013

“Carbonell Recommended” indicates at least one element of this production was deemed award worthy by opening week panelists. The entire production is then eligible for nomination at the end of the season. For more information on the Awards Process please visit: CarbonellAwards.org.

 
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