Screw Spike Lee

Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained is a brilliant flick. Describing a slave's search for his wife in the South and Old West, it more accurately depicts the African-American experience than any of the 15 movies about black culture that African-American director Spike Lee has directed in his lifetime. Last week, it garnered four Academy Award nominations, including best picture.

But ever since it hit theaters on Christmas, Lee has been publicly trashing Tarantino. In announcing his personal boycott of the movie, the Do the Right Thing filmmaker tweeted, "American slavery was not a Sergio Leone Spaghetti Western," and "It Was A Holocaust. My Ancestors Are Slaves. Stolen From Africa. I Will Honor Them."

Lee needs to get over himself. He's upset because Tarantino makes better movies. The man who put Malcolm X on the big screen is Hollywood's resident house Negro, a bourgie activist who tells white auteurs how they can and can't depict African-Americans. He complains that Tarantino uses nigger too much (100 times) in Django Unchained, but show me a white man in the 1800s who wasn't dropping n-b ombs left and right.

C. Stiles
Quentin Tarantino on the set of Django Unchained.
Andrew Cooper, SMPSP / The Weinstein Company
Quentin Tarantino on the set of Django Unchained.

Tarantino is one of Tinseltown's cleverest directors. Some of the most brutal scenes in Django Unchained are metaphors for the unfair racial inequality African-Americans still experience today. (Spoiler alert!) For instance, Leonardo DiCaprio's plantation owner character, Calvin Candie, trains some of his male slaves to fight to the death in a sport called "Mandingo Fighting." When one of the slaves refuses to participate, Candie threatens to feed him to his wild dogs. That scene is analogous to professional boxing, in which the Bob Arums of the world control black fighters through fear and intimidation.

In another scene, slaves are shocked to see Django riding a horse. That's like the people who stare at the dude who returns to the neighborhood driving a Bentley. Django warns the slaves he'll treat them worse than any white man. That's the truth about blacks in positions of authority in today's corporate America. They treat blacks worse than any white boss does.

Lee could never pull off a movie like this. When he's not being an ass from his courtside seats during New York Knicks games, he's making films to which most African-Americans cannot relate.

Follow Luke on Twitter: @unclelukereal1.

 
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7 comments
wndjo21
wndjo21

Spike lee needs to quit trippin he has forgoten what it is to be a real black man

MikkiDean
MikkiDean

Slavery in the US was abolished but you guys making money on it are still at it. Get off the backs of these people and make an honest living. That includes Tarintino and the crap movies he makes in the name of "art". So take your symbolism and stick it. Why would anyone in their right mind want to see a movie about something as disgusting as slavery? There comes a time when you just stop talking about past ills and let it die along with the people who lived it. Spike Lee makes far better movies than Mr. Hatefull. Have you ever met the dude?

shanefromaggio
shanefromaggio

Spike Lee is such a pretentious d-bag.  He has not been relevant for years. Just keep making an ass out of yourself at Knicks games, you little midget.  Anything to stay in the public eye, huh, little man?   If anything, Django CELEBRATES a black man's triumph over adversity, racism, slavery, finding a lost love, etc.  How is that detrimental to African Americans?  Is he implying that the use of the N-word 100 times proves the movie is racist?  Hell, I am surprised it wasn't used MORE.  You are spot on, Luther.  Lee is jealous.  He isn't half the movie maker that Taratino is, and he is bitter that Tarantino, as a white man, makes movies that African Americans can relate to better than the ones he makes. Many, if not most, of the characters in Lee movies serve to further stereotypes, and/or act as a further divider between races.   That takes no talent at all.  Go away, Spike.

ianfilmsnyc
ianfilmsnyc

This whole article is nonsensical and full of bias and contradiction. On one hand you defame Spike Lee for "trashing" Django as if disagreeing with a film's premise is "trashing it." Spike Lee, like anyone else, is free to pick and choose which films he supports. Paying to go see a movie is supporting it. Spike Lee would be hypocrite to put money in the hands of a system that he feels made a tasteless film. And there is enough information about the film at this point for him to make an educated decision. But while you are offended by Spike "trashing" a film, you go on to trash Spike and his career in a very personal and childish way. You claim he makes films that the "majority of blacks cannot rate to." Have you even seen "Do the Right Thing?" "Malcom X?" "Clockers?" "He Got Game" How about his four-part documentary on Hurricane Katrina? Do you think the "majority of black people" cant relate to that? To say Django is in the same category of relevance and truth is outlandish when that film is widely regarded as a fantasy movie (somewhat like Inglorious Basterds) and seems to more inspired by comic book sensationalism and a vivid imagination than real life. And your insights into the films metaphors are also questionable...at one point in your article you make and unfounded claim about Modern-Day White Bosses treating their black employees better than black bosses do (according to what? To whom) But then you go on to to praise a scene in "Django" in which to slaves fight each other in front of their white Master as being analagous to Modern Day Boxing in which white managers and and other business men profit of off two black mean fighting each other. This is a glaring contradiction to your previous point that whites in positions of authority treat blacks more respectfully than their black authoritarian counterparts.I am osurprised you didn't notice this flaw

in reasoning but then again I doubt

this entire article required much

forethought at all.

Amun_Ra
Amun_Ra

Brother …I'd have to disagree We’ve seen too far many movies of slavery in America From Amastad to roots, and now django and its all by design every So often white America must remind us of the whipping,the brutality and the oppression of slavery.Spike lee’s film Malcom X was a poignant portrayal of a great man Who is a significant part of the African American experience in AmericaSpike lee’s brilliant film was snubbed by the Oscars because unlike django. It portrayed a that who was defiant rather than compliant to the oppression that we experienced  We have yet to see films portraying Great Africans like Queen Sheba, Hannibal, Shaka Zulu, Queen Hatshepsut, Abu Bakr II(the ancient ruler of Mali) the pharaoh Akhenaton, Who was the first to conceptualize the theory of One God, that many of modern day religions base their doctrine on. African ancestors who ruled vast empires, and conceptualized much of the knowledge that is still used by modern societies today, numerology, astrology architecture, written history, Africans have established the oldest cultures known to mankind.We continue to ignore and forget that we have a direct lineage to the oldest culture in the world, and allow Hollywood to condition us with the continual effects of slavery. that we black people ourselves label the "African American experience". Needless to say I agree with spike lee’s position and would rather support films that nurture our minds and culture.

lvcze
lvcze

Luuuther, you come across as having the same shortsightedness that you accuse Mr. Lee.  Tarantino "makes better movies," Spike's "Hollywoods resident house negro."  Come, come now, you did not have to go there to express your appreciation for Mr. Tarantino's clever period piece of  a particular aspect of American life.  You come across as an easy lay for your precious Hollywood young king.  Keep an open mind but don't let your brains fall out.  I am a fan of Tarantino.  I have enjoy each and every one of his films to date that I am aware of.  I say the same for our treasured Spike Lee. Your ignorgance of history and eagerness to dismiss the opinions of those that have gone before you smacks of "daddy issues". 

itstrue108
itstrue108

White man's version of black; black man's version of black. You have your version of black; I have my version of black. No two versions are completely alike; no two versions right or wrong.

 
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