Miami Performance International Festival: Work You Can't Hang Over Your Couch

When modern-day performance art took off in the '60s and '70s, it provided a vehicle for artists to turn away from the conventional art market and create works that were ephemeral, visceral, and impossible to sell.

But as performance art pioneers such as Marina Abramovic were described in art history books, and museums took note of their work, the genre has soared. Abramovic even entered mainstream consciousness with the feature-length documentary The Artist Is Present, recently presented on HBO.

The movie shares its title with a performance piece Abramovic created at New York's Museum of Modern Art in 2010. It marked MoMA's first performance retrospective, and the documentary captures Abramovic, who has taken to calling herself "the grandmother of performance art," throughout the lengthiest piece ever executed in a museum.

Belaxis Buil's Perra and Bitch
Belaxis Buil's Perra and Bitch

Location Info

Map

Miami Beach Botanical Garden

2000 Convention Center Drive
Miami Beach, FL 33139

Category: Parks and Outdoors

Region: Out of Town

Details

Miami Performance International Festival, Thursday, July 26, through Sunday, July 29, at Edge Zones Projects, 150 NE 40th St., Miami, and Miami Beach Botanical Garden, 2000 Convention Center Dr., Miami Beach. Call 305-303-8852 or visit miamiperformancefestival.org.

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The Serbian artist, known for drawing no distinction between life and art, creates work that tests the limits of physical and mental endurance. She sat at one end of a table at MoMA while seemingly endless lines of visitors waited to sit at the other end and lock eyes with her in what came to be called "an energy dialogue."

It's that type of challenging work that for decades has had audiences asking, Why is this art? A new collection of work opening here this Thursday poses the same query. Organizers of the Miami Performance International Festival (M/P '12), which is showcasing more than 50 emerging and established talents from 11 countries, call it the "Anti-Basel," referring to the United States' biggest art fair, Art Basel Miami Beach. They say it offers a more democratic platform where audiences can experience the works in a visceral and genuine way, including everyday aspects of people's lives that almost anyone can relate to.

"Don't get me wrong," says Edge Zones' Charo Oquet, the new Miami-based performance festival's founder and chief curator. "Basel has been an important cultural platform for our city. But art is not only about commerce, and we need this type of venture and more like it here year-round to... continue elevating Miami's profile internationally."

A year in the planning, the fair has attracted participants from Mexico, Argentina, Spain, Panama, Colombia, El Salvador, Chile, Guatemala, the Dominican Republic, and Canada who are eager to share the stage with talent from the Magic City.

"During most art fairs, including Basel, most artists find themselves spectators in an arena where they have no control and little engagement with the public," Oquet observes. "At our festival, participant artists will be totally present before the audiences, who will have the opportunity to engage and even become part of their works."

The four-day event will take place at the Miami Beach Botanical Garden and in the Design District and is free to the public. The theme is "The Art of Uncertainty," and M/P '12 will feature panels and talks on the art of performance and workshops for adults and children.

Expect to see plenty of video installations, music, poetry, and other nontraditional art forms in presentations that delve into issues including migration, gender, identity and religion, ecology and feminism, sexual tourism, and living with depression. Some of the works on display will be inspired by early performance art pioneers.

Hollywood's Pip Brant, who is an associate professor of art and art history at Florida International University, is combining her love of music and back-yard farming to create "Chick Wagon," which employs old ladders, kitchen shelves, and children's bicycle parts. The mobile contraption, housing three tiny Malaysian hens, "can provide quail-size eggs and mow the lawn," she says. It can also serve as a quick getaway vehicle to help chicken farmers escape law enforcement in cities that ban livestock from urban dwellings.

"I grew up in Montana and North Dakota," Brant informs. "My grandmother was German and kept chickens until she died."

She says the work was inspired by Austrian feminist artist Valie Export and also takes cues from the work of American high-desert artist Andrea Zittel.

In addition, Brant plans to play the accordion, the saxophone, and the clarinet during her performance.

Canada's Irene Loughlin is another artist who'll draw from her personal background in the work she'll perform this weekend. "My project addresses the experiences of living with depression, anxiety, and the ability to disassociate," she says.

"In the first part of the performance, I will paint lying on the floor under a sheet with a branch in my mouth onto a dropped ceiling," Loughlin explains. "Then I stand up and also paint a circle on the floor, where the viewer will later be invited to stand. I stand in front of the circle and put my head within a head halter-traction kit which is attached to the ceiling or door above. I hold the gaze of the viewer. In the third part of the performance, I will then create wings for religious sculptures out of plaster, and the viewers are invited to assist. I plan to create an alcove of flying religious sculptures."

The Canadian artist says the piece is a direct response to Marina Abramovic's recent work. "In the performance, the viewer is invited to stand in front of me and look at me and hold my gaze. However, here "the artist is not present, due to my disassociation," Loughlin explains. She says Miami's hybrid of cultures and faiths also inspires her piece. "The religious sculptures and Catholicism are part of my history, and I thought it was a way to engage the public about issues of personal freedom and spiritual liberation."

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