"He was stupid to get rid of his lawyers," Andrew's father, Gordon Marshall, admits. The former power lawyer now resides in an assisted living facility in New York. Andrew cut off contact with his family months ago, so Gordon had no idea his son had been convicted until contacted by New Times. "The charges are ridiculous," he says. "I don't know if they drove him to this, but I know that they didn't handle him the way they should have, the way he deserved."

But Gordon Marshall hasn't seen his son in a decade, long enough to miss his descent into paranoia. Asked about Andrew, he recites the same story over and over again, as if to convince himself of the boy's innate goodness: When his son was 8 or 9 years old, he was sitting at the breakfast table when Gordon swatted a fly. The boy began crying. "Why did you kill it?" little Andy asked. "It was a life."

That story doesn't jibe with the younger Marshall's web rants, the arsenal found on his boat, or his detailed sketches showing how to convert his inert grenades into lethal explosives.

It's unclear what plot, if any, Marshall had in store for the marina or the City of Miami. The FBI and Miami Police were clearly worried about the combination of his anger and explosive materials. But as startling as Marshall's arsenal was, and as chilling as his threats, the only crimes prosecutors could pin on him related to the silencers.

"All of the other information and evidence didn't establish a crime," says David Tucker, a court-appointed attorney who represented Marshall during his trial. "Even the chemicals were, unto themselves, legal."

But Tucker allows that Marshall has serious problems, which he intended to introduce in court during sentencing in November. Instead, Marshall dismissed the lawyer and is representing himself once again.

"I saw no evidence of a government conspiracy [to set Marshall up in retaliation for his lawsuits]. This is a pretty straightforward case," Tucker says. "Marshall has very serious emotional and mental issues that the court should consider."

Steve Bickle, a neighbor from the marina, defends him. "I know that they accused him of making a silencer, but all he had was a tube and some washers. That's it. He never completed anything," he says. "Their attitude is: 'If you don't agree with the government, you must be a bad guy, you must be a terrorist.'" He moved to northern Florida shortly after Marshall's arrest.

Friend Dave Bricker concedes, "It's a big mess, most of all for Andrew Marshall. But given the pain Andrew was under and the obstacles he was up against, I think a lot of people would have cracked."

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5 comments
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Dmarino31190
Dmarino31190

WOW disregard my comment please and read the level headed version of what i wish I could have said below by dave Bricker!. Damn the insatiable need for emotions to override my ability to get my point across clearly and concisely.

Dmarino31190
Dmarino31190

WOOo somebody who tried to use our system the right way hit the wall of heartless stupidty and got tired and went to solving problems the only way the big fat morons listen but unfortunately their pockets are too deep people are to complacent and ignorant sure maybe he was crazy but doesn't change the fact that we are all crazy too sometimes and some of us just get fed up with the bullshit. One day alot more people may turn to that path if they get as fed up as he did ouch.....wonder what would happen awwwe just a nasty situation....

Dave Bricker
Dave Bricker

This one's better, Mr.Miller. It sounds more like you're letting your characters tell their story instead of casting them in some fantastic play. Will you allow the tragedy of Andrew Marshall's alleged descent into violence to create a smokescreen for the legally disconnected matter of whether the City of Miami denied him access to just compensation, public records and fair hearings? Though I won't stand as an apologist for anyone's violent intentions, do Marshall's incarceration, conviction and post-pepper-spray mugshot automatically negate the validity of the charges Marshall filed against Florida DEP and the City of Miami? Marshall ground himself down trying to fight something he thought was important—and he was no dummy.

My own direct experiences with the City of Miami and the State of Florida failing to respond to some (but admittedly not all) of my records requests, denying me standing to petition for a redress of grievances and bypassing due process are a matter of record. After Andrew Marshall was arrested, I sold my boat, abandoned my website (the unfulfilled records requests and other documents are still posted there), withdrew from waterfront politics and dismissed any lingering fantasies that I live in a fair democracy. I don't want to own a gun and I frankly have intelligent people and worthwhile causes to engage with on fairer playing fields. Others will have to decide whether the loss of an advocate for constructive dialog and public process is of any consequence to Miami's waterfront.

As previously stated, Marshall's conduct and the City of Miami's are legally disconnected matters. Whether circumstances would have been different if Andrew Marshall had gotten a fair trial and a chance to present his evidence long ago is a matter of conjecture. Neither party's wrong makes the other right, but after casting Andrew Marshall as "Miami's Unabomber," I challenge you to report objectively on what just may be the bigger picture.

Sir Sausage
Sir Sausage

$5 says the "grenade launcher" was actually a 37mm flare launcher.

 
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