Sharks attack, fishermen and scientists battle
Mike McLaughlin introduces his shark-hunting video and then shoots and skewers the bad boys.

The sun hangs low over the ocean as Anthony Segrich prepares for the last dive of the day. The boyishly handsome, 33-year-old Delray Beach tech consultant tugs at his camouflage wetsuit and shoulders his scuba tank. Somewhere in the depths below the small dive boat, a school of cobia swirls around an old shipwreck like glitter in a snow globe. Above, the surface is calm, the weather good. Before submerging, Segrich catches sight of Riviera Beach's swanky hotels two miles in the distance. Then he slips into the blue-green abyss, spear gun in hand.

A small scooter pulls him down toward the wreck. After circling the algae-encrusted tower for a few minutes, he closes in on a cobia, aims, and fires. The spear sails through the three-foot-long fish, sending blood swirling in all directions. Segrich doubles back toward the boat to unload his catch, which is still struggling. At 60 feet below the surface, he pauses to pull out a float bag for his prey.

Suddenly the injured cobia bolts past him, trailing the line. Just behind it: a seven-foot bull shark.

A female sandbar shark chomps on a water hose that allows it to breathe while on deck.
George Martinez
A female sandbar shark chomps on a water hose that allows it to breathe while on deck.
Andrew Cox subdues a nurse shark while other researchers take blood and tissue samples.
George Martinez
Andrew Cox subdues a nurse shark while other researchers take blood and tissue samples.
Neil Hammerschlag injects blood taken from a nurse shark into a tube for lab analysis.
George Martinez
Neil Hammerschlag injects blood taken from a nurse shark into a tube for lab analysis.
High school student Jon Cruciger kisses a tuna head for good luck before tossing it out as shark bait.
George Martinez
High school student Jon Cruciger kisses a tuna head for good luck before tossing it out as shark bait.
Anthony Segrich with his “chum bucket,” recovering after he was attacked by a female bull shark.
Michael E. Miller
Anthony Segrich with his “chum bucket,” recovering after he was attacked by a female bull shark.
Anthony Segrich's leg after the attack.
Courtesy of Anthony Segrich
Anthony Segrich's leg after the attack.
Mike McLaughlin introduces his shark-hunting video and then shoots and skewers the bad boys.
Mike McLaughlin introduces his shark-hunting video and then shoots and skewers the bad boys.

Segrich has seen dozens like it throughout the day: inky shadows circling, waiting for wounded fish. But this one is too close for comfort.

A second shark strikes without warning — a 12-foot, 400-pound missile. At the last instant, Segrich catches sight of its gaping, basketball-size mouth headed straight for his left thigh. But before the creature can bury its serrated teeth into him, he shoves its head away with his left hand. Instead, the shark chomps down on Segrich's calf.

While the diver thrashes, the bull shark opens its mouth and bites again, tearing off a football-size chunk of flesh. Then it backs off, as if savoring the taste. Blood clouds the water, and Segrich reaches down to pull together what's left of his torn calf. He covers the wound with an elastic hip pouch and motors frantically toward two mates who are swimming nearby. The shark charges, but Segrich's friend thrusts a scooter in its face. The beast retreats.

Segrich screams when his fellow divers haul him onto the deck of the boat. Blood gushes from the wound until his friends use a plastic zip tie as a tourniquet. When someone dials 911, Segrich mumbles that his blood type is O-negative. The boat races toward shore.


Shark World XXX video. (Warning: graphic content.)


Long before that shark attack, Mike Newman, another kind of mariner, stood on Jupiter Beach, staring at the sea. A winter storm front had just moved through, leaving the Atlantic as calm as a sheet of glass. But 25 feet down, the water was churning with sharp, triangular fins.

It's slaughter time, he thought.

Newman raced to the marina, boarded his boat the Sea Pig, and roared onto the open sea. Newman, a tall, cocky then-21-year-old with a taste for trucks and Corona beer, gripped the wheel with callused hands. Shirtless but dressed in bright-orange fishing pants and boots, he howled with joy while gunning the 26-foot vessel past the massive school of spinner sharks. Two buddies dropped 2,000 feet of gill net over the side.

Within minutes, the sharks were surrounded. The frenzied fish doubled back but were trapped between the beach and Newman's netting.

A wall of water a half-mile long exploded upward as the sharks hit the net at 30 mph. Newman grabbed his .44 magnum revolver from the cabin and began loading bullets. Then the three men hauled the net onto the boat. Newman cut the webbing to let the first spinner flop onto the deck. As the five-foot monster writhed, the fisherman cocked his gun, aimed at the back of the creature's head, and fired a single slug into the thick cartilage. The fish shuddered and then went limp.

As the other fishermen hauled the next shark onboard, Newman plunged a 12-inch knife into the first spinner, slicing off its head, tail, and fins with a butcher's precision. He saved the "plug" of meat for the market, tossed the fins into a basket on top of the cabin to dry, and deposited the head near the bow — it was the first of the day's nearly 200 grisly trophies.

"I used to love murdering the fuckers," Newman recalls of that day two decades ago. "Hell, we'd shoot spinners just for fun."

Still home to roughly two-thirds of the registered commercial shark fishermen in the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico, Florida is the stubborn heart of the U.S.'s dying commercial shark-fishing industry. But as state and federal regulations on shark hunting have grown stricter over the past 20 years, most fishermen have given up stalking the predators. The number of commercial shark hunters in Florida has shrunk from several thousand to barely a hundred.

So as the hot weather and Florida beach season begin, sharks are on the rebound. Attacks like the one on Anthony Segrich might well follow.

For 400 million years, sharks have patrolled the seas around what is now the Sunshine State. As a species, they are twice as ancient as most dinosaurs. Ever since humans appeared 2 million years ago, we have feared them. Sharks were there to devour the bodies of Taíno Indians slain by Christopher Columbus in 1492. And they followed slave ships across the Atlantic, waiting for castaways. In the Pacific, islanders have long considered them gods.

In South Florida, the commercial shark-fishing industry didn't take off until World War II, when oil from the beasts' livers was used as aircraft lubricant or marketed as vitamin-rich "cod liver oil." In the decades after the war, fishermen from Miami, Broward, and Palm Beach counties caught bull sharks by the hundreds, often using ten- or 20-mile lines with thousands of hooks.

In the early '80s, Mike Newman was among a legion of young fishermen eager to kill the giant creatures. The son of a submarine engineer, he skipped classes at North Shore High School in West Palm Beach to fish with friends. At the time, the federal government was practically begging fishermen to kill sharks instead of swordfish, which had been heavily overfished.

"The government was pushing shark like crazy," Newman remembers. "They gave out grants. They published shark recipes. All the grocery stores were selling shark steaks. Every bar around here was cooking shark burgers on a grill and serving them with beer."

By his early 20s, Newman had his own boat and was hauling in more than $100,000 per year catching primarily sharks. He began buying fins from friends, drying them in barrels in his garage like beef jerky, and selling them to dealers around the world to be used in shark fin soup. South Florida was shark slaughter central.

Then in 1992, faced with plummeting shark populations, the National Marine Fisheries Service proposed pulling the plug on unlimited shark fishing. The same year, Florida banned commercial fishing of most sharks in state waters, forcing fishermen to head at least three miles offshore. Shortly afterward, state officials outlawed using nets to catch sharks. Newman and other shark fishermen protested, but lost.

Rather than buy tens of thousands of dollars' worth of new gear for deeper water, he gave up and began helping marine biologists catch and release sharks for scientific studies.

Authorities have been reducing shark quotas ever since, and the few shark fishermen who remain have become increasingly angry with scientists and government officials. Some — like John Miller, a scruffy, young commercial fisherman who pilots the Crusader out of Jupiter — even warn that unless more fishing is allowed, more sharks will mean more attacks.

"They are as thick as I've ever seen 'em in my life," Miller says. "The schools keep doubling in size, moving down the beach, and eating everything in their way. It's getting out of control."

"My name is Mike McLaughlin," a sunburned man in fishing suspenders says as he peers nonchalantly into a shaky camera and smacks chewing gum. "We kill things for a living."

Electric guitar riffs wail in the background. The video cuts to brief, spliced images of sharks being aggressively jerked back and forth on a line off the side of the boat. As the music builds to a frenetic punk pace, a sandy, six-foot nurse shark is yanked up from the surface like a dog on a leash. Then McLaughlin aims a shotgun at its head and fires, spraying water and blood five feet into the air.

"Shark World!" the background music shouts.

McLaughlin and another man laugh and joke as they waste at least a dozen nurse, bull, lemon, hammerhead, and sandbar sharks in quick succession, jabbing sharp gaffs through the creatures' mouths or eyes before blasting them with the shotgun.

"Fucking fish," McLaughlin says while aiming his gun at a large bull shark. The camera cuts to a headless shark flopping on the deck.

"Where are you going?" he asks and then answers his own question: "Nowhere."

"This one is for Steve Schafer!" McLaughlin finally yells as he pumps lead into a small shark while invoking the name of a kiteboarder who died in 2010 after a bull shark shredded his legs off Stuart Beach.

The three-minute video appeared on YouTube this past March under the title Shark World XXX but was removed within a couple of days. One outraged commenter said McLaughlin should be fed to the sharks. Other viewers asked if shooting sharks was still legal. "Idiotic lowlifes never change or they wouldn't be capable of this shit in the first place," another wrote on Facebook. "They're still doing it, but now we can't get at them."

Shocked scientists from the University of Miami reported the video and relayed the animal abuse to state and federal investigators.

Lisa Gregg, who handles shark licenses for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, says her agency reviewed the tape and determined that although the men's actions might be distasteful, there was no wrongdoing. Investigators concluded the massacre occurred in federal waters, making state bans on harvesting of lemon and sandbar sharks irrelevant.

Gregg adds that "the video was taken from a spy cam [and] was significantly edited for shock value."

As for the shotgun blasts, "I have talked with a few research biologists that have worked on commercial shark vessels, and they said it is common practice, and it is also not illegal," Gregg says. "This was a commercial trip and not wasting an animal's life for no justifiable reason."

Federal authorities from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) also investigated and decided there was no crime. "The stuff on the video isn't considered illegal in federal waters," NOAA agent Ken Blackburn says. "What's the best way to dispatch a large number of animals?" he asks rhetorically. "I'm not the one to say what's OK and what's not."

The captain of the ship that appeared in the video, an irascible lifelong Keys shark fisherman named Peter Boehm, says he fired McLaughlin, whom New Times couldn't reach for comment. "The video is a bunch of crap. It's not what I'm about. I run a legitimate business here."

But Boehm, who some scientists criticize for being far too aggressive with sharks, admits the shotgun blasts are typical. "What do you think happens?" he asks. "How is that any different than a slaughterhouse? Do you eat meat? How do you expect us to fish for a living? Animals have to be killed. As far as shooting sharks, there is no other way to really handle them."

The Giant Stride — a white, double-decker, 42-foot dive boat — rumbles along six miles southeast of Islamorada's Bud n' Mary's Marina. In the stern, a slight man with frizzy hair and freckles addresses a gaggle of high school kids. Dressed in matching neon-orange Crocs and University of Miami hat, Neil Hammerschlag smears sunscreen on his pale skin as he speaks about disappearing sharks and the fragile ecosystems where they dwell.

As the boat chugs toward a bright-orange buoy, the students crowd into the stern and a ghostly outline forms in the waters below. For five minutes, a crew member reels in a heavy line until finally the water erupts and a six-and-a-half-foot sandbar shark bursts through the surface as if gasping for air.

Hammerschlag and two other team members swiftly slide the shark onto the boat, where it whips its powerful tail against a crew member's leg. The scientist straddles it like an aquatic cowboy, thrusting his small hands down onto the convulsing creature's head to keep it from turning and attacking. "A sandbar!" he shouts, referring to the species of shark. "Hi-yo!"

He is the nemesis of shark killers such as Boehm and McLaughlin. The founder of UM's R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program, Hammerschlag makes it his mission to catch, examine, and tag as many sharks as possible. He and his colleagues not only track the creatures — they recently traced one all the way to New Jersey — but also check levels of mercury and other toxins the sharks have absorbed from atop the food chain.

Hammerschlag goes out tagging twice a week in the Keys. He begins every expedition aboard the Giant Stride with an explanation to ten or so students about why he has devoted his life to saving sharks. It's a sort of prayer before holy shark communion.

"One hundred million sharks are killed every year," he begins today. "That's 270,000 a day. The problem with that is they can't reproduce fast enough to deal with that kind of overfishing... In the last 50 years, 90 percent of the world's sharks have disappeared, mainly to make soup — shark fin soup." His voice is tinged with anger. "It has no taste, no nutritional value. But in China it's like caviar: a status symbol."

Hammerschlag has loved the torpedo-like predators since he was a child living in South Africa. Born in Johannesburg, he vacationed with his electrical-engineer father and beautician mother in Durban on the western edge of the Indian Ocean. Instead of playing on the beach, Hammerschlag stayed on the dock and watched fishermen slit open the massive sharks they had caught. He was enthralled.

When he was 7, his family moved to Toronto, where Hammerschlag grew up. But he remained fascinated by sharks. At age 15, he persuaded his parents to send him to the Bahamas, where he went on his virgin shark dive.

"I was scared," he admits. "But I was the first one in the water." After attending college in Toronto, Hammerschlag moved to Miami to study marine science at UM. A master's degree quickly became a Ph.D. and then a teaching position. He met his wife, a pretty Swiss blonde named Caroline Peyer, on a dive trip. Since they were married two years go, Caroline has become a shark researcher too. The couple plans to name their children for different varieties of the species.

Hammerschlag has made headlines around the world for his research on sharks. In 2009, he published a paper about the hunting strategies of great whites. While watching sharks devour Cape fur seals, he realized the attacks weren't as random as commonly thought. Instead, older sharks acted like underwater assassins, learning the best hiding spots and carefully positioning themselves deep enough to develop the speed necessary to hit the surface and catch unsuspecting seals.

Last year Hammerschlag hosted a "Summit at Sea" for celebrities including Sir Richard Branson. Also in 2010, he received death threats after defending the bull sharks that devoured 38-year-old Stephen Schafer while kiteboarding near Stuart. Though there were 11-inch chunks torn from Schafer's thighs and buttocks, Hammerschlag told newspapers that "deadly shark attacks are very rare" and the fish "usually don't bite people unless provoked."

"I wince every time there is an attack," he says now. "It's never good, for sharks or for people."

Hammerschlag's efforts to protect sharks have also made him enemies among local shark fishermen, including Boehm. Last year the shark hunter unexpectedly phoned Hammerschlag to say he had found a shark tag belonging to the scientist. Then Boehm asked him how much he would pay for it, Hammerschlag says.

When Hammerschlag hesitated, Boehm hung up, but not without delivering a warning first: "I'm going to throw the tag up in the air and shoot it."

That was before the shark snuff video surfaced. Now Hammerschlag is incensed.

"I don't want to start a war against commercial shark fishermen," he says. "But the guy on the video is proud of himself. It doesn't look like they are doing this to make a living. They aren't just following orders. They are clearly getting enjoyment out of seeing these animals in distress."

Hammerschlag doesn't apologize for his affinity for sharks. Rather, his eyes light up when he's asked about his latest research. Great white sharks' teeth are loosely set in their jaws, he explains intently. They have their own nerves and blood supply, "almost like fingertips.

"They can splay them out like a cat's claws," Hammerschlag says, "and use them to gather information about objects."

Sometimes that object is a person, he admits. But even among notoriously deadly great whites, more than 90 percent of attacks aren't fatal.

"I've seen thousands of attacks on seals," Hammerschlag says. "They are brief, vertical attacks... Within seconds there is nothing left. If a white shark wanted to eat you, it could. There's nothing easier than catching a 150-pound monkey swimming in the water," he adds wryly. "They are two-ton killing machines. But there are people who have been quote-unquote attacked by a great white, with their head in its jaws, and had nothing to show for it but a couple of stitches.

"What does that tell you?" he asks. "They didn't survive because of their bravery. That was the shark's decision."

Anthony Segrich isn't so sympathetic. Since his run-in with the shark April 26, he has spent the past month in a tiny corner room at St. Mary's Medical Center in West Palm Beach. For hours every day, he cradles what looks like a small lunch cooler. A fine tube of blood runs from the contraption to Segrich's swollen, cast-covered leg.

"It's my wound vac," the Luke Wilson look-alike says with a hint of pride. "I call it my chum bucket. It's what they use in Iraq and Afghanistan nowadays to rebuild muscle tissue."

Like a war veteran, Segrich will likely be haunted by the attack for years to come. But for now, he seems strangely well-adjusted for someone who lost half his blood — and nearly his leg — by the time he arrived at the hospital. "I don't know if you're squeamish," he adds, taking out his iPhone, "but I pretty much filmed the whole thing."

Segrich shows video of the 13-inch bite marks on his left leg and the cavernous hole where his calf used to be. "It was pretty chunky at first," he says. That was before three operations, 126 stitches, and a skin graft.

Then he pulls up underwater footage a friend shot while spearfishing with Segrich. A loaded spear gun looms in the foreground. Just ahead of Segrich, a cluster of cobia shifts back and forth in the ocean current. And in the background: the unmistakable silhouettes of a half-dozen sharks, patiently circling, waiting for blood.

Segrich's shark attack is one of just a handful so far this year in Florida; none has been fatal. Last year there were 13 attacks; the only deadly one was the incident involving the kiteboarder killed off Stuart Beach. But like many shark fishermen, Segrich says he has seen more sharks this year than ever before.

"The seasonal closures give them a chance to rebound and breed more," he says. "The season is shorter and shorter, and you're allowed to take fewer and fewer sharks. Their population is definitely rebounding. I'd like to see more shark fishing. There's definitely more of them, and they're definitely more aggressive. When those alpha males don't get taken out, they get more aggressive."

John Miller, the Jupiter fisherman who's been hunting sharks for nearly a decade, agrees. Because of restrictions that took effect this year, he's allowed to fish them only beginning July 17, when the Atlantic shark season opens. Last year the date was January 1. Catch limits are strict. Miller blames scientists for the shorter season. "We're the ones who really see what's going on," he insists. "There ain't no shortage, I can tell you that much."

Not nearly as much shark meat is sold today as in the past, but the fins have become more popular. They routinely fetch $50 a pound — more than 50 times the value of shark meat. Rarer kinds can command $500 for the same amount. Although most of the fins make their way to Hong Kong, a half-dozen restaurants in Miami still serve shark fin soup. A few states, including Hawaii, California, Washington, and Oregon, have moved to ban shark fins altogether.

Segrich believes the restrictions on shark fishing need to be lifted. "I'm not sure the scientists know what's a healthy shark population," he contends. He also insists he won't stop spearfishing. And although he won't go Shark World XXX on the ocean creatures, he will be quicker to pull the trigger when he spots a shark.

"If I see one swimming around with a bit of wetsuit in its mouth," he warns, "that one's got a bull's-eye on its back."

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55 comments
Lou
Lou

What a waste of life. These people have no respect for our wildlife. Shame on you all. Sharks need our protection...they should not be hunted, they should be able to live in their natural habitat without being disturbed. Shark v's Gun ....not a fair battle. Pathetic. I only hope the government enforce a full shark hunting ban asap.

Michael Wind
Michael Wind

people are killing all the fish,sharks will eat people,mostly pollution from ships,just think how much garbage has been dumped by cruise ship,soon people will be swimming in garbage...

James
James

Camouflage suit Dive Tank Scooter. I'd bit him too.

ariel
ariel

pretty sad, actually! if you had left the shark alone, as it should have been, none of this would have happened.

don
don

Pretty lame to just shoot anything that cant defend itself very lame

Villavecesnatalia
Villavecesnatalia

SHAME ON THOSE FISHERMANS I HOPE THEY PAY WITH THERE LIFES! Those that hurt animals will hurt humans

Seanu
Seanu

Having been born and raised in Jupiter, and still residing here to date, I absolutely loved this story. Knowing many of the commercial boys in town, and being an avid fisherman myself, I concur that there is now an increase in the population of sharks.... at least locally. Sometimes I find it difficult to bring in a whole fish to the boat, once it's been hooked. Especially when jigging the bottom. However, the sharks migrate just like all other species. They come and go in seasons. Like the local Snook population, which was devastated by recently harsh weather conditions, all species will recover in time. That does not give us the right to tear the population of these species back down once they have recovered. A shark's personality does not change because it feels dominant in quantity. A person that feels confident in this theory has watched way too many shark flicks. The sharks are the top tier of this very fragile ocean food chain, and we must continue to respect them. Without them, ALL other species of fish will aggressively die off. So, if you like Cobia, Kingfish, Sailfish, Marlin, Pompano, Triple-Tail, and the many other profitable species which you sell on the market.... take the time to respect the shark. Without the shark, the fishing will cease completely... and so will the human life. I have been a spear-fisherman for over 20 years. If you see a shark, and are still willing to risk that perfect shot.... don't blame the shark that bites your dumb ass. Anthony, I'm sorry that you got bit. I wish you the very best. However, try to view this incident in a shark's perspective..... Like you while spearing that Cobia, the shark was just taking an available meal. Unfortunately, you became tangled in that green cloud of blood, and the shark got confused. I have come very close to being attacked before, but I have never bit. I have considered myself lucky on a few occasions. I can't imagine your pain. You seem very wise and very strong minded. Use your knowledge of this incident to further understand the shark, not show retaliation against this amazing species. I wish you well, and wish you great spearing in the near future.Take Care,Sean

CHEVY15TH
CHEVY15TH

THESE CREATURES WHERE HERE LONG BEFORE HUMANS ,AND DESERVE RESPECT AND THE RIGHT TO LIVE IN THE HABITATE THAT BELONGS TO THEM, WE ARE INVADING THIER HABITATE AND THERE WILL A PRICE TO PAY. I SURE WOULD LIKE TO SEE THOSE GUYS TAT THINK THAT THERE BAD ASS BY SHOOTING A ANIMAL THAT HAS DONE NOTHING BUT DO WHAT IT HAS DONE WITHOUT PEOPLE USEING ITS WATERS AND ACTING LIKE THIER THE ONLY ONES THAT DESERVE RESPECT. NO WONDER WE AS A WHOLE , WONDER WHAT WILL BE THE HUMANRACE DEMISE,ITS THOSE SAME GUYS WHO SAY THEY ARE DOING THE WRONG THING FOR ALL THERE SO CALLED RIGHT REASONS,IF THIS IS NORMAL, IM GLAD IM NOT.

On Time Backhoe
On Time Backhoe

HEY MIKE...CAN YOU FEEL THE LOVE... THIS HAS BEEN ON THE FRONT PAGE OF THE PAPER NOW FOR 8 DAYS...

Jack99
Jack99

It cracks me up the way eco-elitists and predator-worshippers just assume sharks would not be assholes if they were human.

Joe
Joe

Sad. Dumbass fisherman kills what he doesn't eat.

J Copeland22
J Copeland22

why do you kill if you dont eat it ????????return

GMAN
GMAN

This guy that kills these sharks is really a serial killer he probabely has many human bodies buried about any where he has traveled throughout his life. someone who apparently takes pleasure in his cowardly acts,as these sharks are in their natural element(he belongs on land in a jail for homicidal maniacs) is covering up his actual past time(murder) The police should actually follow up on this guy . the may solve some previously unsolved murders!!!

Rasmf
Rasmf

what comes around goes around.... he will get his.

Edward
Edward

Portrait of an ugly human being. He goes out and kills things just because he doesn't like them and it gives him a thrill. Ugly, ugly, ugly.

Kent
Kent

After reading Michael Miller’s article Snuffed, I take issue with his assertion that shark populations are rebounding when in fact they are not. First and by way of background, I suffered a very similar if not identical injury to Anthony Segrich while engaging in the exact same activity he was at the time I got hit. Ten years ago, I was spear fishing in a remote area off of Grand Bahama Island, when I got hit by what was determined to be an 8 foot bull shark. I lost most of my left calf in the incident and had to be airlifted to Jackson’s Ryder Trauma Center where I also had to go through painful skin grafting and weeks of rehab. This however is where our similarities end. According to the article, it appears that Mr. Segrich views these animals as little more than a nuisance and insists that shark fishing bans need to be lifted, presumably so as to reduce his risk of having another run in when he returns to spear fishing. What he apparently doesn’t understand is that our shark populations are largely migratory and just because he sees a lot more in an area that he hunts regularly doesn’t mean their populations are rebounding. Bull sharks in particular are highly opportunistic and territorial and tend to hang around areas where fishing activity occurs, which may certainly give him the impression that shark populations remain healthy. Also, when you consider it takes a shark almost ten years to reach sexual maturity and only one or two pups on average that survive a litter, the seasonal closures he is referring to do little to actually sustain our coastal shark populations.

Since my accident, I have given up spear fishing, not because I don’t enjoy fresh fish on the dinner table, but because in the last ten years, I have seen a drastic decline in our marine environment, including the disappearance of most of our larger fish species, including grouper, snapper and sharks. Instead, I have taken up underwater video and photography and actually spend a lot of time in the water filming and photographing sharks, which is getting harder and harder to do by virtue of the fact that sharks are getting fished out at unsustainable rates. I have also endeavored to learn as much about these animals and try to educate people as to the realities of what these creatures are about and the pressure they are under, largely as a result of our own ignorance and stupidity. Incidents involving people and sharks are nothing more than accidents, which to a large extent are entirely preventable if we just exercise a little common sense and respect the fact that sharks play a vital role in the environment as the top end of the ocean’s food chain. As a result of their dwindling population in many parts of the world, huge imbalances are taking place at alarming rates underwater, resulting in unsustainable proliferations of certain fish and other marine species and disappearances of others.

Notra99
Notra99

Sharks are in their element Never saw one chase a person down the street Damn humans are every where theres no place where animals can be left alone

Ernesto
Ernesto

Don't be silly sharks are dangerouis animals whenever i get a chance I kill them

Alexis.
Alexis.

You act like the sharks search to eat people.. newsflash, he was in deep water spearing fishing. Sharks eat fish and watch for easy pray all day long. They saw an opportunity and took it. He was just in the way and around the blood. It was stupid for him to even do that. He should know how sharks behave if he wants to fish. As far as the the shark fishermen, they're idiots. Sharks help keep the oceans ecosystem in check. Sharks are fearful creatures and should be feared, but they are also beautiful creatures that have been around for millions of years. They are the perfect predator and they are something to admired from a far.

WashingtonCoverUp
WashingtonCoverUp

WASHINGTON IS MAKING UP ALL THE NEWS FOR THE MEDIA TO REPORT ON

Here are FBI MOST WANTED TERRORISTS and their online aliases. Some are wanted for U.S. embassy bombings in Kenya & Indonesia. Do these two places ring any bells?

Search Google Images for;Mark Joyner Simpleology-Seif Al Adel (Sarah Palin’s book Palinology) John Ferrero-Ramadan ShallahYaro Starak-Umar PatekArmand Morin-Noordin M Top (said to be killed in Indonesia and now removed from the FBI’s list)(Like the death of Osama "story")Michael Filsaime-Ali Sayyid Muhamed Mustafa al-BakriDr. Mani Sivasubramanian-Ammar Mansour BouslimTed Ciuba-Abdul Rahman Yasin

Many get rich quick scams serve as product placement for new cutting edge internet technologies, and logos, some sold through Clickbank. The people appearing in testimonials are part of the expansion of this organization and are often pitching other high priced products and services. They all link to one another through their marketing strategies and ability to optimize in search rankings.

Between the aliases the use, and the way in which they speak about things, everything they do has double meaning. Their faces in Google image search is similar to the picture book of symbols mentioned in The Da Vinci Code movie. Here is a code of look a likes pitching all sorts of stuff who are interconnected;

Selling a program on making millions online is Professor James Bradley who looks like the Pentagon bomber Bill Ayers.

Jay Conrad Levinson is behind a number of “guerilla” marketing and advertising books. He looks like George Soros, who’s last name is a (palin)drome. Soros has been credited for collapsing a number of nation’s currencies. George Soros has been quoted several times regarding his views on a New World Order.

The Super Affiliate Handbook is sold by someone who looks like Jill Biden, her name is Rosalind Gardner. Some appear to represent people, more in how they pose, rather then a direct look alike. Stephen Pierce appears to represent radical Van Jones, Brett McFall-Austan Goolsbee, John Childers-Andy Stern, and Jay Abraham as Ayman al-Zawahri, just to name a few.

Problem with your Google Adwords PPC ads and can’t get a straight answer? You could try Yanik Silver who looks a lot like Sergei Brin, but he probably won’t know. He sells 33 Days to Online Profits (prophets.) Why not try Perry Marshall, who looks like Obama’s priest Reverend Pfleger? He sells The Definitive Guide To Google Adwords, infringing upon Google’s trademark.

Many more can be found at Lorrie Morgan Ferrero’s Red-Hot-Copy blog such as; 72 Virgin Records Richard Branson, & White House Party Crashers the Salahi’s with Valerie Jarrett’s daughter.

The Rich Jerk sent out emails promoting Stompernet in Atlanta Georgia. The staff included Brad Fallon, an airline pilot, and Eben Pagan selling a seminar "Get Altitude". 3 days after reporting this code to the FBI, Delta in Atlanta canceled a large number of flights due to “safety reasons.” In the Youtube videos related to the Rich Jerk, it appears that Mark Cuban is the Rich Jerk. He’s the billionaire who owns the Dallas Maverick’s basketball team. Think O'bomber or Barrac-uda Palin would play for him? Another guy seen on Youtube claiming to be Robert Johnson Rich Jerk, is Tony Rezko.

Obama announced his run for office on Oprah Winfrey’s show. Have you ever noticed that Oprah’s friend Gayle King looks like Whitney Houston? Think that her name could be a code, Whit_ney White-Hous_ton House?

It appears the internet marketing experts controlled the comments, the headlines, and the finance of the last election online with the highest ranking site in Google search, Youtube.

In my strongest opinion this is the last piece of the puzzle, Osama Bin Laden is also a spokesperson, and a look-a-like. Osama represents Obama/Biden (Bi)n La(den.)

CODE CRACKED AND CONSPIRACY EXPOSED!http://www.washingtonian.com/b...

COPY AND PASTE THIS TO ALL POLITICAL NEWS SITES

Captsky2005
Captsky2005

Then the same for all the Wall st. people.

Captsky2005
Captsky2005

I guess you have never seen a slaughterhouse? Enjoy your burger.

Jovan Rodriguez
Jovan Rodriguez

The shark did not back away to savor the taste! it backed away because it did not like the taste of human blood.

i love sharks!
i love sharks!

The people that found the identity of the caveman shooting the sharks are those from TGSCI and it was because of THEIR hard work and diligence that this guy's name came to be and it was THEY who called the FWC and reported him. Get your facts right man.Also, to all of the people in this article minus Neil; i hope a shark devours you. You're no good to mankind.

martes
martes

spearfishing, especially when sharks are around, and then surprised when a shark attacks ? Thats being foolish.

Isaza20
Isaza20

I am a spearfisher and nature enthuciast! They just wants those sharks for their jaws. The caught them, take off the jaws and throw them back to the ocean! There has to be a way this kind of inhumane practice be controlled or banned

Neilhammersghlag
Neilhammersghlag

This article is extremely sensationalized in every way and does not paint a good picture of fisherman or scientists..

I think this article portrays a battle between scientists and fisherman. I don't believe this to be entirely true, especially in my case. I work side by side fisherman in the Florida Keys who help me with my research given their years of experience.

Mike Newman (discussed in the article) is a good example where a shark commercial fisherman now uses his knowledge to support shark conservation research.I don't think this was depicted properly in the article.

My only objection was to the extremely disturbing and destructive shark killing activities portrayed in the Shark XXX video - http://www.work-sucks.be/Priva...

I have bee in contact with the gentleman who runs the operation, who says he was not aware of the activities on the video and has since fired the former employee after the video surfaced.

Regarding the article, my opinion is that every sentence is an effort to sensationalize the issues and as a result generate further animosity among fisherman, shark attack victims and scientists.

Dr. Neil Hammerschlag

Paul
Paul

what were those guys thinking, spearfishing when they could SEE the sharks?!

Kcee
Kcee

fucking idiots. Their punishment should be exactly what they are doing to those poor sharks. All for profit...

NELLY
NELLY

The Shark should have ate them Both.Phreaking idiots,leave the phreaking animals alone.

On Time Backhoe
On Time Backhoe

Hey Michael Nice Video... from On Time Back Hoe & tell the Capt I said hello

Lockuptherednecks
Lockuptherednecks

Morons. Would you take the salmon from a grizzly bear's mouth? Would you try to wrestle with a lion eating a gazelle? You are too stupid to realize the consequences of your actions. Fish belong in the sea and rednecks belong far away in the woods where they won't taint society with their idiotic ways. Why doesn't somebody pass a law to protect us from imbeciles. "There ain't no shortage, I can tell you that much."

Darrell36m
Darrell36m

shark, thinking ; hmm he tasted different than that rag head a few weeks ago....

Jack99
Jack99

I believe that your happiness about being non-normal abides on solid gorund.

Rb
Rb

I'm embarrassed for you, Ernesto. Apparently, you haven't learned to think before you speak.

You raise a good point. Sharks are dangerous animals. So are dogs. And dogs kill many more people than sharks do. Do you kill dogs also "whenever you get a chance"?

Bkdiver
Bkdiver

Amazing how ignorance prevails when it comes to sharks... particularly from those who have no actual source of reference but what they get from the media

fact101
fact101

Sharks eat people sometimes, and people eat sharks. Seems fair to me. That said, over-fishing is a very bad thing, no matter what the species (excluding invasives).

Jack99
Jack99

And you are obviously the greatest thing since sliced bread. Perhaps we could clone you and have a whole planet-full of shark-lovers. For the lovely sharks to eat...

Captsky2005
Captsky2005

You ever hear of shark fin soup or shark meat dumbass.

jack99
jack99

What's even worse is gardeners -- no class at all. They plant seed, and deliberately grow helpless plants and then EAT them just as they mature. And then they BRAG about it. They shouldn't be allowed outside. There's tons of food in the store, no need to be so cruel.

Pinocho
Pinocho

I know very well that you have never been spearfishing sharks deserve to die I don't think we need them

Kcee101
Kcee101

they plant seed... We need to preserve nature including sharks which are an essential part of our ecosystem. We can grow and cultivate plants and eat them anytime we like, yes of course... its actually very convenient that we have the option of picking a few from a million seeds and grow them at will. Same thing cant be said about sharks. their numbers are actually declining thanks in part to shark finning, fishing, uneducated ignorant bafoons like yourself and just plain cruelty.

Grant Nathan
Grant Nathan

Whats wrong with you lot. This film is sick! First of all they ate killing endangered animals second shark attacks ate very very rare and spear fishing is like walking through an area where lions are with a dead zebra strapped to your back. These guys should be locked up!

phantom
phantom

Wow You are really an ignorant fool. You know, we don't need you either. Maybe you deserve to die also.

Jack99
Jack99

1) "Buffoon", not "bafoon" -- it really kills the effect when a self-righteous wannabe elitist trys to demonstrate superiority, but can't spell.2) Maintaining a viable predator population is one thing, worshipping a predator (or any animal) is something else entirely.3) Shark-worshipper = human-hater.

 
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