Claudine helped him deal with the case. She hired a lawyer — and her efforts drew the couple together. Soon they were living together, first in Fort Lauderdale, then in the tidy Pompano place where Claudine and Will now live.

That essentially is what caused Wildrick to be thrown out of the country. He violated probation several times, once because he was walking a dog across the street from their townhouse. Another time, a probation officer found a folding knife in his house. Then Hallandale cops found him holding a semiautomatic pistol in his lap. He claimed it belonged to a friend. Finally, in 2009, he was busted for a DUI, and that was it. He was sentenced to nine months and remained behind bars until the government sent him to his death in Haiti.

"I am shocked at this," says Michael Gottlieb, the attorney who represented him. "He is a soft-spoken, nice guy. This wasn't someone who would attack or hurt anyone. It's very sad."

Claudine Magloire with a photo of her friend and lover, now deceased, Wildrick Guerrier.
George Martinez
Claudine Magloire with a photo of her friend and lover, now deceased, Wildrick Guerrier.
Elliot Longchamps
Elliot Longchamps

Elliott Longchamps's case is quite different. Activists from Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center (FIAC) cite him as a guy who shouldn't be deported. They are wrong. A review of his criminal record and a conversation with his wife indicate this is someone who shouldn't be allowed on our shores.

Once a tall string bean of a man — six feet and 140 pounds — he has a criminal record that stretches back to 1980, when he was convicted of felony burglary after stealing $200 worth of jewelry from two women in Miami. He was accused but not convicted of burglary and robbery in the 1980s.

Then in 1990, he married a purchasing agent from Jackson Memorial Hospital named Kena Gordon. Three years later, she filed for divorce. Her claim: Longchamps had beat her bloody 15 to 20 times during their marriage. "Busted lips, bleeding gums," she told prosecutors in a deposition. But that was only the beginning. One night in 1992, she said, "he choked me nearly to death and tore my clothes off... He locked me in the room so that no one would hear."

Later, she said, he stalked her with a gun. Once, she fired twice at him when he followed her to a home in Brownsville. In 1992, he was convicted of assault and trespassing. And three years later, he was nailed for stalking.

Claims against Longchamps continued. In 1999, he was acquitted by a jury of sexual battery. In 2004, he married Mere Meregne Bien-Aime, an emotional, sophisticated-looking woman who fell hard for him. She had a daughter from a prior marriage. He had two kids, all of whom were grown.

The next year, cops arrived at their Aventura home and dragged Longchamps, who had bulked up to 200 pounds, to jail. A police report claims he had "punched his wife in the left eye, causing a bruise and blood to form in the eye."

Mere Longchamps dropped the charges. And today, she begs the government to free her husband from the Louisiana jail where he is being held. She argues that he is a changed man.

"I don't have a way to talk to my husband," she sobbed at a press conference held by FIAC earlier this month. "I miss him so much it is hurting. Please do something to give us a chance so we can be with my husband."

Almost as weird as that reaction from a woman who had apparently been beat was FIAC Executive Director Cheryl Little's. "This is not a dangerous criminal," she said.

When I asked about his court record, Little became confused for a moment. "I don't have the file right now," she said. "But I can tell you this much: This is not a serious offender. He was sentenced to 18 months." Then she continued: "Why is it so urgent for the U.S. to deport Haitians when Haiti remains in ruin? It makes no sense for either country... This is death by deportation."

In that last comment, she might be right. Before his death, Wildrick Guerrier joined 25 other detainees in a hunger strike. In a letter, they complained they "were languishing in a prison... with no definitive answers concerning [their] situation," according to a letter signed by all the strikers. "Phone calls are $25 for 15 minutes, and visitation is nearly impossible due to the distance being that we are all from Florida."

The hunger strike lasted six days. It ended just two days before the 27 Haitians were deported. Upon their arrival, all were held in a Haitian jail, where they drank water from a filthy barrel. Cholera is a waterborne disease.

Soon after his arrival, two of Wildrick's aunts flew to Haiti to care for him. Authorities realized he was sick and released him. He was quickly taken to a doctor, who administered an IV, Claudia remembers. A week or so after his deportation, he died — ingloriously — on a toilet. So far, at least, no autopsy has been done.

The U.S. government has been mum about Guerrier's death. No apologies. No investigation. Barbara Gonzalez of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement wouldn't comment on the matter except to regurgitate a written statement: "ICE is resuming the removal of criminal aliens in coordination with the government of Haiti and consistent with our domestic immigration enforcement priorities. ICE is legally required to repatriate criminal aliens to their country of origin or release them into U.S. communities if their repatriation is not reasonably foreseeable."

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13 comments
Dcm2000k9
Dcm2000k9

Illegal? Kick them out!!!!!!! No matter what or from where they come.

Mark5w
Mark5w

Kicked a cop in the nuts ? did i read that right ? I don't think I would do that and im white and here legally fourth generation maybe fifth but im not sure yup plymouth rock has been under my families feet ,if you don't know what plymouth rock is look it up or go visit it ,it's in plymouth Mass They dug a hole put the rock in so people can view it .yup it's still their last time i looked

Mark5w
Mark5w

I wonder what would happen to an American citizen if they sneak into a country do something illegal GET caught and put up a fuss I bet they just hang you stone you or just shoot you imprison you and forget about you or all of the above .Deportation I think is a legal gift of the USA a Bullet would cost tax payers allot less and theway the government spends money the bullet may just be the rout they go soonso just come through the gate legal or stay the hell out .Oh and if you are here illegal up yours you deserve what ever legal tax payers can afford to do with you

Lcohoone
Lcohoone

Miami is just a racist place when it comes to people from the Afro-Islands than from Latin America, its the truth! I am neither Hatian or Latin American!

Trappedintx1
Trappedintx1

It's been my experience Cuban people seem to be more pleasant to be around, a little more motivated to go out there and work and less violent. Most Haitians I've had the displeasure to be around are rude, lazy workers, expect things to be handed to them, inconsiderate, and selfish only thinking for themselves. Most low wage workers in SFla are Haitians, and I can tell you the service is horrendous...No hello, thank you or anything else which would be considered some type of customer service. We have plenty out of work people here, and college kids who would be more than happy to take their jobs and smile while doing so. I say deport all of them.

maury970
maury970

I feel bad for the Haitian Community but the writer should write about the whole deportation process, because is the same for Central Americans and everybody else , they been doing that for years , how come now is only not fair for haitians ? , they had destroy families, living children without parents and now is only not fair for haitians ? This guy had a criminal record sowhat makes him extent of the law .

joseluis
joseluis

what about the Cuban people.

bknymia
bknymia

i have no compassion for deportees... just go the right way to become a citizen and you wouldn't be crying about being deported.

Jae
Jae

The real issue I have is that when they get deported they end up in Haitian jails. Since they already did their time in the US. The US should allow them to go to Haiti without handing them over to Haitian officials who always jailed them because the Haitian officials attitude is if the US can't handle you then you are a heinous criminal that need to be locked up.

The deportees should be allowed to go home to Haiti without the stigma because being a deportee because no one really wants to associate with you down there even family members especially if you were not helping them while you were living in the US. They should have the opportunity to go down there on their own without being jailed. immigration law is clear cut, once you're a convict or suspect of associating with terrorist you will be deported not ifs or buts about it. Obama administration won't change it because he wants to be reelected and don't want to seen to be soft on criminals. So instead of wasting money in lawyers, they should take that money and start their life over in Haiti. I know a couple of deportees who are successful business people in Haiti but I suppose if you were unproductive in the US then you're probably going to be worst off in Haiti. So going to Haiti itself is not a death sentence but ending up in a Haitian jail may be.

Jo
Jo

Well sir I'm truly sorry that you haven't met any real Haitians who take pride in their race and who know how to comport themselves in a cordial and utmost respectful manner. I am Haitian myself and trust me, there are some of us good Haitians out there. I was born and raised in New York City but nonetheless, I'm Haitian. In the near future I hope you meet an agreeable educated respectful Haitian.

Etienne417
Etienne417

you need to think of other people families before you say this. you have no heart and you are very selfish. your opinion is not needed either.

cleancut77
cleancut77

What Haiti decides to do with deportees is on them not the USA. The USA can suggest not order.

The law is clear, foreign nationals who commit felonies MUST be deported. Why should we shelter Haiti's criminals?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Then we should deport Cubans who have committed felonies. Yet we don't. Do you ever wonder why?

 
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