Still, her characterization of herself as a young girl seemed the most delusional. Naïve and saccharine as a sugar-loaded Shirley Temple, Sheridan sounded like an Amy Sedaris parody of an obnoxious little girl.

Frannie Sheridan keeps it in the family.
Frannie Sheridan keeps it in the family.

Details

Confessions of a Jewish Shiksa... Dancing on Hitler's Grave!By Frannie Sheridan. Directed by Shari Upbin.Through February 12 at Area Stage at the Riviera Theater, 560 South Dixie Hwy., Coral Gables; 305-666-2078; areastagecompany.com.

Weekly Improv Shows at Just the FunnyImprovisational theater by all members of the JFT Cast. Directed by Carlos Rivera and Johnny Cabrera. Every Friday and Saturday, 9 and 11 p.m. at Just The Funny Theater & Training Center, 3119 Coral Way, Coral Gables; 305-693-8669; justthefunny.com.

Although the true story behind Confessions is dramatic enough, and the play has an important message to impart about acceptance and tolerance, the script and production could use some tough love. Sheridan should write another draft, have it edited by someone she's not closely associated with, and think about employing a full cast of actors to portray the characters. That could make the final product less self-centered. If acceptance is the theme of this play, Sheridan may want to accept this friendly advice.

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4 comments
Kmartinelli
Kmartinelli

When I saw "Confessions of a Jewish Shiksa," I brought a friend with me. We were both deeply moved by her one-woman show, which ends with a powerful bang and a good message. We both were moved to tears and my friend vowed to come back with her parents. According to her, they "need to see this show." A lot of people need to see this show. It's transforming and beautiful.

Terry Kline
Terry Kline

I have seen Frannie Sheridan's play 3 times and each time, I enjoy it even more. Elyse, you should take my friendly advice and stick to reviewing images of a girl licking some dude’s rear. You are far too insensitive and crude to comment on true art or talent. While Frannie's show is extended on Sundays through February 13th, and she moves it to New York City, you might want to take pole dancing lessons; perhaps then you will be recognized for having some talent...Writing reviews is so not your forte!

Joan
Joan

Thankfully, neither the cheering fans in the audience nor those still buying tickets for "Confessions of a Jewish Shiksa..." appear to agree with this review! Frannie Sheridan's gift is drawing people in, embracing them and leaving them, with tears and laughter, wanting more -- all by herself! This Valentine of a one-woman show has been extended on Sundays through February 13th, and I can't wait to experience it for my fourth time locally, before Ms. Sheridan brings it to New York.

Daniel R. Cohen
Daniel R. Cohen

Wow! I was really surprised to read this review a few days ago as I had just seen this show because of the preview that you had written, and I loved the show! What an original interpretation. I have been an avid lover of solo shows from Whoopie's characterizations to monoluge-ists like Spalding Gray and was so taken with Frannie Sheridans fresh interpretation. Mimetics, the crisp use of defining each character was executed with such clarity that I actually forgot that I was watching only one woman. I have to say that beyond the clever humor, you seemed to have forgotten that this show is firstly a drama. And a beautifully written and performed dramatic work it is! Did you just miss all the poignantly acted and written scenes and look only for the laughs? I am actually confused by your review and must tell you, as a theater critic myself, that I feel strongly that you've entirely missed the mark. Oh, and the Chinese character whose name I've forgotten was terrific! I am a fan of some but not all of Margaret Cho's work and less so of Amy Sedaris, but nothing of this character was a copy of their work but a very fresh comedic interpretation with such a successful punchline that the audience was laughing all the way ino the next scene. Real theater, must take the chances. I believe the job of any credible critic, is to further the work of an artist by writing a balanced review. As opposed to attacking with as you mentioned "tough love" , a tad outdated my dear, attacking an artist of obvious talent and merit who has the cajones to put themself out in the fray and take the kinds of chances a solo performer takes, as opposed to sitting arrogantly behind pushing buttons on one's laptop. You might wish to see a bit more solo theatrical work, I mean real theater as opposed to comedy improv or something, prior to taking a stab at covering real theater. And I am writing this not with tough love, but dissapointment that a critic could be so off!Sincerely,Daniel R. Cohen

 
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