The mixed seafood grill arrived as a colorless arrangement containing two pieces each of shrimp, squid-like sepia (cuttlefish), and scallops. Only the last were thick and juicy; the other ordinary components were grilled with little trace of garlic, lemon, moisture, or spice. Other entrée options include braised short ribs, Colorado lamb chops, sesame-seared tuna, and grouper in corn vinaigrette ($17 to $25). The price covers choice of two side dishes, which isn't bad. We tried workmanlike mashed potatoes, decent creamed corn (if not very creamy), and "chef's mix," described as a creative assemblage of fresh, seasonal vegetables that translated to corn with peppers, onions, and some snippets of artichoke heart. Only French fries excelled — the crisp, skinny sticks sprinkled with Parmesan cheese and herbs.

The less said about the meatballs, the better. Four desiccated spheres of chopped veal are served atop stiff strands of spaghetti barely moistened with bland tomato sauce. If chef Punchy thinks this is the way to serve pasta, maybe we ought to refer to him as chef Punch Drunky.

Our dessert of chocolate molten lava cake came without the lava. Just kidding. We didn't order that one, nor did we ask for chocolate brownie with ice cream, or tiramisu. Instead, we chose French toast with caramelized bananas and a shmear of Nutella — a sweetly pleasing dish that would make a swell breakfast.

If Stone Grill's telephone is working by now, you can call in advance and arrange for stone-top cooking of the mixed grill or of one of four steaks also seared on the rock: a six-ounce skirt or filet mignon, a seven-ounce flat iron, and a nine-ounce New York strip ($16 to $23). As for the lack of lava cuisine during our dinner: After dessert, our guests invited us over to their place to finally get stoned.

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